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Invisible barriers in international labour migration: The case of the Netherlands

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  • Dalen, H.P. van
  • Henkens, C.J.I.M.

    (Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research)

Abstract

Why is labour mobility in the European Union so low? To shed light on this issue we focus and examine international labour migration intentions of the Dutch potential labour force. A key characteristic of intended labour migration of the Dutch is that its low level and the fact that it is strongly age related. The low expected rate of migration can be traced to expectations about finding work abroad and the perception that foreign experience is not perceived to be valued by Dutch employers. In addition to this it appears that partners within a household carry a large weight in deciding to move. If one of the partners is against moving, emigration will not take place.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research in its series Discussion Paper with number 2009-16.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:dgr:kubcen:200916

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Keywords: labour mobility; migration; identity;

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References

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  1. Borjas, George J & Bronars, Stephen G, 1991. "Immigration and the Family," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(2), pages 123-48, April.
  2. Hatton, Timothy J., 2004. "Emigration from the UK, 1870 1998," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 8(02), pages 149-171, August.
  3. Amelie Constant & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2007. "Measuring Ethnic Identity and Its Impact on Economic Behavior," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 721, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  4. Hendrik Dalen & George Groenewold & Jeannette Schoorl, 2005. "Out of Africa: what drives the pressure to emigrate?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 741-778, November.
  5. Anzelika Zaiceva & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2008. "Scale, diversity, and determinants of�labour migration in Europe," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(3), pages 428-452, Autumn.
  6. Hendrik P. van Dalen & Kène Henkens, 2007. "Longing for the Good Life: Understanding Emigration from a High-Income Country," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 33(1), pages 37-66.
  7. Bonin, Holger & Eichhorst, Werner & Florman, Christer & Hansen, Mette Okkels & Skiöld, Lena & Stuhler, Jan & Tatsiramos, Konstantinos & Thomasen, Henrik & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2008. "Report No. 19: Geographic Mobility in the European Union: Optimising its Economic and Social Benefits," IZA Research Reports 19, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Kan, Kamhon, 1999. "Expected and Unexpected Residential Mobility," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 72-96, January.
  9. Puhani, Patrick A., 1999. "Labour mobility - an adjustment mechanism in Euroland? Empirical evidence for Western Germany, France and Italy," ZEW Discussion Papers 99-47, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  10. Stephen Drinkwater, 2003. "Go West? Assessing the willingness to move from Central and Eastern European Countries," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0503, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  11. Sendhil Mullainathan & Marianne Bertrand, 2001. "Do People Mean What They Say? Implications for Subjective Survey Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 67-72, May.
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Cited by:
  1. Gligorov, Vladimir, 2009. "Mobility and Transition in Integrating Europe," MPRA Paper 19198, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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