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Better Safe than Sorry? Ex Ante and Ex Post Moral Hazard in Dynamic Insurance Data

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Author Info

  • Abbring, J.H.
  • Chiappori, P.A.
  • Zavadil, T.

    (Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research)

Abstract

This paper empirically analyzes moral hazard in car insurance using a dynamic theory of an insuree's dynamic risk (ex ante moral hazard) and claim (ex post moral hazard) choices and Dutch longitudinal micro data. We use the theory to characterize the heterogeneous dynamic changes in incentives to avoid claims that are generated by the Dutch experience-rating scheme, and their effects on claim times and sizes under moral hazard. We develop tests that exploit these structural implications of moral hazard and experience rating. Unlike much of the earlier literature, we find evidence of moral hazard.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research in its series Discussion Paper with number 2008-77.

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Date of creation: 2008
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Handle: RePEc:dgr:kubcen:200877

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Web page: http://center.uvt.nl

Related research

Keywords: insurance; moral hazard; selection; state dependence; event-history analysis;

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References

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  1. Jaap H. Abbring & James J. Heckman & Pierre-André Chiappori & Jean Pinquet, 2003. "Adverse Selection and Moral Hazard In Insurance: Can Dynamic Data Help to Distinguish?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(2-3), pages 512-521, 04/05.
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Cited by:
  1. Georges Dionnne & Pierre-Carl Michaud & Jean Pinquet, 2012. "A Review of Recent Theoretical and Empirical Analyses of Asymmetric Information in Road Safety and Automobile Insurance," Cahiers de recherche 1204, CIRPEE.
  2. Levon Barseghyan & Jeffrey Prince & Joshua C. Teitelbaum, 2011. "Are Risk Preferences Stable across Contexts? Evidence from Insurance Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(2), pages 591-631, April.
  3. Arthur Lewbel & Xun Lu & Liangjun Su, 2012. "Specification Testing for Transformation Models with an Application to Generalized Accelerated Failure-time Models," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 817, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 01 May 2013.
  4. Georges Dionne, 2012. "The Empirical Measure of Information Problems with Emphasis on Insurance Fraud and Dynamic Data," Cahiers de recherche 1233, CIRPEE.
  5. Yingyao Hu & Matthew Shum, 2008. "Nonparametric identification of dynamic models with unobserved state variables," CeMMAP working papers CWP13/08, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  6. Spenkch, Jörg L., 2011. "Adverse selection and moral hazard among the poor: evidence from a randomized experiment," MPRA Paper 31443, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Spenkuch, Jörg L., 2012. "Moral hazard and selection among the poor: Evidence from a randomized experiment," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 72-85.

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