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The Trust Game Behind the Veil of Ignorance: A Note on Gender Differences

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  • Vyrastekova, J.
  • Onderstal, A.M.

    (Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research)

Abstract

We analyse gender differences in the trust game in a "behind the veil of ignorance" design.This method yields strategies that are consistent with actions observed in the classical trust game experiments.We observe that, on averge, men and women do not differ in "trust", and that women are slightly more "trustworthy".However, men's strategies are bimodal, peaking at the subgame perfect Nash equilibrium and the Pareto efficient frontier, while women's strategies are single peaked at moderate tranfers.Moreover, if a man [woman] exhibits low trust, he [she] is likely to be a money-maximizer [a risk or betrayal averse reciprocator].

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research in its series Discussion Paper with number 2005-96.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:dgr:kubcen:200596

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Keywords: gender differences; trust game; experiment; strategy method behind the veil of ignorance;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Vyrastekova, J. & Garikipati, S., 2005. "Beliefs and Trust: An Experiment," Discussion Paper 2005-88, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  2. Leonardo Becchetti & Giacomo Degli Antoni & Stefania Ottone & Nazaria Solferino, 2011. "Allocation criteria under task performance: the gendered preference for protection," Econometica Working Papers wp32, Econometica.
  3. Sapienza, Paola & Toldra Simats, Anna & Zingales, Luigi, 2007. "Understanding Trust," CEPR Discussion Papers 6462, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Reuben, E. & Suetens, S., 2008. "Conditional Cooperation: Disentangling Strategic from Non-Strategic Motivations," Discussion Paper 2008-33, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  5. Jana Vyrastekova & Sander Onderstal & Pierre Koning, 2010. "Self-Selection and the Power of Incentive Schemes: An Experimental Study," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 10-074/1, Tinbergen Institute.
  6. Pierre Koning & J. Vyrastekova & S. Onderstal, 2006. "Team incentives in public organisations; an experimental study," CPB Discussion Paper 60, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  7. Leonardo Becchetti & Giacomo Degli Antoni & Stefania Ottone & Nazaria Solferino, 2011. "Spectators versus stakeholders with or without veil of ignorance: The difference it makes for justice and chosen distribution criteria," Working Papers 204, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

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