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The Importance of Sample Attrition in Life Cycle Labor Supply

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Author Info

  • Ziliak, J.P.
  • Kniesner, T.J.

    (Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research)

Abstract

We examine the importance of possible non-random attrition to an econometric model of life cycle labor supply including joint nonlinear taxation of wage and interest incomes and latent heterogeneity.We use a Wald test comparing attriters to nonattriters and variable addition testing based on formal models of attrition.Results from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics are that non-random panel attrition is of little concern for prime-aged male labor supply estimation because the effect of attrition is absorbed into the fixed effects.Attrition is less econometrically influential than research design decisions typically taken for granted; the wage measure or instrument set has a much greater impact on the estimated labor supply function of prime-aged men than how one includes panel attrition.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research in its series Discussion Paper with number 1996-46.

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Date of creation: 1996
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Handle: RePEc:dgr:kubcen:199646

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Web page: http://center.uvt.nl

Related research

Keywords: panel data; labour supply; econometric models; income tax; GMM;

References

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  1. Keane, Michael P & Runkle, David E, 1992. "On the Estimation of Panel-Data Models with Serial Correlation When Instruments Are Not Strictly Exogenous," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 10(1), pages 1-9, January.
  2. Maeshiro, Asatoshi & Vali, Shapoor, 1988. "Pitfalls in the Estimation of a Differenced Model," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 6(4), pages 511-15, October.
  3. Hubbard, R Glenn & Skinner, Jonathan & Zeldes, Stephen P, 1995. "Precautionary Saving and Social Insurance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(2), pages 360-99, April.
  4. Griliches, Zvi & Hausman, Jerry A., 1986. "Errors in variables in panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 93-118, February.
  5. Becketti, Sean, et al, 1988. "The Panel Study of Income Dynamics after Fourteen Years: An Evaluatio n," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(4), pages 472-92, October.
  6. Blomquist, N Soren, 1985. "Labour Supply in a Two-Period Model: The Effect of a Nonlinear Progressive Income Tax," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(3), pages 515-24, July.
  7. Charles F. Manski, 1989. "Anatomy of the Selection Problem," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(3), pages 343-360.
  8. Verbeek, Marno & Nijman, Theo, 1992. "Testing for Selectivity Bias in Panel Data Models," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 33(3), pages 681-703, August.
  9. Whitney K. Newey & Kenneth D. West, 1986. "A Simple, Positive Semi-Definite, Heteroskedasticity and AutocorrelationConsistent Covariance Matrix," NBER Technical Working Papers 0055, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Lo, Andrew W. & Newey, Whitney K., 1985. "A large-sample chow test for the linear simultaneous equation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 351-353.
  11. Ziliak, J. & Kniesner, T.J., 1995. "Estimating Life-Cycle Labor Supply tax Effects," Papers 9589, Tilburg - Center for Economic Research.
  12. Heckman, James J. & Macurdy, Thomas E., 1986. "Labor econometrics," Handbook of Econometrics, in: Z. Griliches† & M. D. Intriligator (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 32, pages 1917-1977 Elsevier.
  13. Eric M. Engen & William G. Gale & John Karl Scholz, 1994. "Do Saving Incentives Work?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 25(1), pages 85-180.
  14. Manski, C.F., 1990. "The Selection Problem," Working papers 90-12, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
  15. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
  16. Hubbard, R Glenn & Skinner, Jonathan & Zeldes, Stephen P, 1994. "Expanding the Life-Cycle Model: Precautionary Saving and Public Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 174-79, May.
  17. Hausman, Jerry A & Wise, David A, 1979. "Attrition Bias in Experimental and Panel Data: The Gary Income Maintenance Experiment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 455-73, March.
  18. Smith Conway, K. & Kniesner, T.J., 1993. "Estimating Labor Supply with Panel Data," Papers 93-015, Indiana - Center for Econometric Model Research.
  19. Thomas MaCurdy & David Green & Harry Paarsch, 1990. "Assessing Empirical Approaches for Analyzing Taxes and Labor Supply," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(3), pages 415-490.
  20. Sean Becketti & William Gould & Lee Lillard & Finis Welch, 1985. "The Panel Study of Income Dynamics After Fourteen Years: An Evaluation," UCLA Economics Working Papers 361, UCLA Department of Economics.
  21. Altonji, Joseph G, 1986. "Intertemporal Substitution in Labor Supply: Evidence from Micro Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(3), pages S176-S215, June.
  22. Nijman, T.E. & Verbeek, M.J.C.M., 1992. "Testing for selectivity in panel data models," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-153280, Tilburg University.
  23. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G., 1993. "Estimation and Inference in Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195060119, September.
  24. Li, Q. & Kniesner, T.J., 1994. "Semiparametric Panel Date Models with Hetergeneous Dynamic Adjustment: Theoretical Considerations and an Application to Labor Supply," Working Papers 1994-9, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance.
  25. Johnson, William R & Skinner, Jonathan, 1986. "Labor Supply and Marital Separation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(3), pages 455-69, June.
  26. MaCurdy, Thomas E, 1983. "A Simple Scheme for Estimating an Intertemporal Model of Labor Supply and Consumption in the Presence of Taxes and Uncertainty," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 24(2), pages 265-89, June.
  27. Runkle, David E., 1991. "Liquidity constraints and the permanent-income hypothesis : Evidence from panel data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 73-98, February.
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  29. repec:fth:stanho:e-90-11 is not listed on IDEAS
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Thomas J. Kniesner & W. Kip Viscusi & Christopher Woock & James P. Ziliak, 2005. "How Unobservable Productivity Biases the Value of a Statistical Life," NBER Working Papers 11659, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Harold Alderman & John Hoddinott & Bill Kinsey, 2004. "Long Term Consequences Of Early Childhood Malnutrition," HiCN Working Papers 09, Households in Conflict Network.
  3. Shao-Hsun Keng & Wallace Huffman, 2010. "Binge drinking and labor market success: a longitudinal study on young people," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 303-322, January.
  4. Jorge González-Chapela, 2007. "On The Price Of Recreation Goods As A Determinant Of Male Labor Supply," Working Papers. Serie AD 2007-04, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
  5. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2004. "Modelling Low Pay Transition Probabilities, Accounting for Panel Attrition, Non-Response, and Initial Conditions," CESifo Working Paper Series 1232, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. Thomas J. Kniesner & W. Kip Viscusi & Christopher Woock & James P. Ziliak, 2006. "Pinning Down the Value of Statistical Life," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 85, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  7. Michael Fertig & Stefanie Schurer, 2007. "Labour Market Outcomes of Immigrants in Germany – The Importance of Heterogeneity and Attrition Bias," Ruhr Economic Papers 0020, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.

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