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The effect of moving on union dissolution

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Author Info

  • Paul J. Boyle

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Hill Kulu

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Thomas Cooke
  • Vernon Gayle
  • Clara H. Mulder

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This paper examines the effect of migration and residential mobility on union dissolution among married and cohabiting couples. While there is a large, multi-disciplinary literature looking at the determinants of union dissolution in Europe and North America, the possible impact of geographical mobility has received little attention. This is despite the fact that moving is a stressful life event and that numerous studies suggest that women’s economic well-being and employment suffer from family moves which are usually stimulated by the man’s career. We base our longitudinal analysis on retrospective event-history data from Austria and apply hazard regression. Our results show that couples who move frequently have a significantly higher risk of union dissolution. We argue that frequent moving increases couple stress and union instability through a variety of mechanisms.

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    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2006-002.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its series MPIDR Working Papers with number WP-2006-002.

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    Length: 33 pages
    Date of creation: Feb 2006
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2006-002

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: Austria; dissolution of marriage; event history analysis; internal migration; residential mobility;

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    References

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    1. Evelyn Lehrer & Carmel Chiswick, 1993. "Religion as a determinant of marital stability," Demography, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 385-404, August.
    2. Lillard, Lee A., 1993. "Simultaneous equations for hazards : Marriage duration and fertility timing," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1-2), pages 189-217, March.
    3. Gunnar Andersson, 2003. "Dissolution of unions in Europe: a comparative overview," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-004, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Sandell, Steven H, 1977. "Women and the Economics of Family Migration," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 59(4), pages 406-14, November.
    5. Jan M. Hoem & Alexia Prskawetz & Gerda R. Neyer, 2001. "Autonomy or conservative adjustment? The effect of public policies and educational attainment on third births in Austria," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-016, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    6. Hill Kulu, 2005. "Fertility and spatial mobility: evidence from Austria," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2005-002, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    7. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-73, October.
    8. Mason, Karen Oppenheim & Jensen, An-Magritt (ed.), 1995. "Gender and Family Change in Industrialized Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198289708.
    9. Evelyn Lehrer, 1996. "Religion as a determinant of marital fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 173-196, June.
    10. Larry Bumpass & R. Raley, 1995. "Redefining single-parent families: Cohabitation and changing family reality," Demography, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 97-109, February.
    11. Annette Erlangsen & Gunnar Andersson, 2001. "The impact of children on divorce risks in first and later marriages," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-033, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    12. Becker, Gary S & Landes, Elisabeth M & Michael, Robert T, 1977. "An Economic Analysis of Marital Instability," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(6), pages 1141-87, December.
    13. T. Balakrishnan & K. Rao & Evelyne Lapierre-Adamcyk & Karol Krotki, 1987. "A Hazard Model Analysis Of The Covariates Of Marriage Dissolution In Canada," Demography, Springer, vol. 24(3), pages 395-406, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:
    1. Magdalena M. Muszynska, 2006. "Woman’s employment and union disruption in a changing socio-economic context: the case of Russia," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-027, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Magdalena Muszyńska, 2008. "Women’s employment and union dissolution in a changing socio-economic context in Russia," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 18(6), pages 181-204, April.
    3. Magdalena M. Muszynska & Hill Kulu, 2006. "Migration and union dissolution in a changing socio-economic context: the case of Russia," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-032, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Nadja Milewski, 2006. "First child of immigrant workers and their descendants in West Germany: interrelation of events, disruption, or adaptation?," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-034, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. Nadja Milewski, 2007. "First child of immigrant workers and their descendants in West Germany," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(29), pages 859-896, December.
    6. Paul J. Boyle & Hill Kulu, 2006. "Does cohabitation prior to marriage raise the risk of marital dissolution and does this effect vary geographically?," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-051, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    7. Magdalena Muszyńska & Hill Kulu, 2007. "Migration and union dissolution in a changing socio-economic context," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 17(27), pages 803-820, December.

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