Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Age correspondence for different mortality regimes with and without the change point

Contents:

Author Info

  • Maxim S. Finkelstein

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The mortality rates are steadily declining with time. The remaining lifetime for e.g. 65 years old person even 20-30 years ago was substantially smaller than nowadays. Therefore, the age correspondence problem for populations in different mortality regimes is of interest. A simple solution, based on the equality of accumulated mortality rates (or, equivalently, on the equality of probabilities of survival) is considered. Furthermore, the mortality regime with a change point is defined and the procedure of age re-calculation after the change point is suggested. Two age re-calculation models (and their combination) are discussed: the first one accounts for wear accumulation in the process of aging and the other is characterized by a kind of memoryless property.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2003-039.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its series MPIDR Working Papers with number WP-2003-039.

    as in new window
    Length: 13 pages
    Date of creation: Dec 2003
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2003-039

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords:

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. F.T. Denton & B.G. Spencer, 1996. "How Old Is Old? revising the definition Based on Life Table Criteria," Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports, McMaster University 316, McMaster University.
    2. James W. Vaupel, 2002. "Life Expectancy at Current Rates vs. Current Conditions," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 7(8), pages 365-378, August.
    3. James Vaupel & Anatoli Yashin, 1987. "Repeated resuscitation: How lifesaving alters life tables," Demography, Springer, Springer, vol. 24(1), pages 123-135, February.
    4. Gabriele Doblhammer, 2003. "The late life legacy of very early life," MPIDR Working Papers, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany WP-2003-030, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. John Bongaarts & Griffith Feeney, 2002. "How Long Do We Live?," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(1), pages 13-29.
    6. Rembrandt D. Scholz & Heiner Maier, 2003. "German unification and the plasticity of mortality at older ages," MPIDR Working Papers, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany WP-2003-031, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2003-039. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Wilhelm).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.