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The role of income in marriage and divorce transitions among young Americans

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Author Info

  • Simon Burgess
  • Carol Propper
  • Arnstein Aassve

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Abstract

The paper investigates the importance of income in young Americans’ decisions to form and dissolve households. Using data on young American men and women from the NLSY, an important role for income in both these transitions is found. There are significant differences between young men and women. High earnings capacity increases the probability of marriage and decreases the probability of divorce for young men. High earnings capacity decreases the probability of marriage for young women, and has no impact on divorce. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2003

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2002-022.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its series MPIDR Working Papers with number WP-2002-022.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: May 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2002-022

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Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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Cited by:
  1. Almudena Sevilla-Sanz & Delia Furtado and Miriam Marcen, 2010. "Does Culture Affect Divorce Decisions? Evidence from European Immigrants in the US," Economics Series Working Papers 495, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  2. Delia Furtado & Miriam Marcén & Almudena Sevilla, 2013. "Does Culture Affect Divorce? Evidence From European Immigrants in the United States," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 1013-1038, June.
  3. Ahituv, Avner & Lerman, Robert I., 2005. "How Do Marital Status, Wage Rates, and Work Commitment Interact?," IZA Discussion Papers 1688, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Bruno Jeandidier & Lucile Bodson, 2009. "Revenus d'activité et désunion en Europe," Post-Print halshs-00521364, HAL.
  5. Siv Gustafsson & Seble Y. Worku, 2006. "Marriage Markets and Single Motherhood in South Africa," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 06-102/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  6. Avner Ahituv & Robert Lerman, 2007. "How do marital status, work effort, and wage rates interact?," Demography, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 623-647, August.
  7. John M. Nunley & Alan Seals, 2010. "The Effects of Household Income Volatility on Divorce," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(3), pages 983-1010, 07.
  8. Audrey Light & Yoshiaki Omori, 2013. "Determinants of Long-Term Unions: Who Survives the “Seven Year Itch”?," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 32(6), pages 851-891, December.
  9. Siv Gustafsson & Seble Y. Worku, 2006. "Marriage Markets and Single Motherhood in South Africa," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 06-102/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  10. Macunovich, Diane J., 2011. "Re-Visiting the Easterlin Hypothesis: Marriage in the U.S. 1968-2010," IZA Discussion Papers 5886, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Jeffrey Dew & Joseph Price, 2011. "Beyond Employment and Income: The Association Between Young Adults’ Finances and Marital Timing," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 424-436, September.

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