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Risk Sharing and Network Formation

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Author Info

  • Gubert, Flore
  • Fafchamps, Marcel

Abstract

In this article the authors examine the motivation behind the formation of risk pools. They do so by using as suitable study data survey information collected among the rural poor of the Philippines. They discuss the possibility that network formation comes as the result of an attempt to maximize gains derived from shared risk to income within a social group. They note that the most significant benefits of pooled risk occur when individuals are of different occupations and there is a variety of risks faced.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Paris Dauphine University in its series Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine with number 123456789/10840.

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Length:
Date of creation: May 2007
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in American Economic Review, 2007, Vol. 97, no. 2. pp. 75-79.Length: 4 pages
Handle: RePEc:dau:papers:123456789/10840

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Web page: http://www.dauphine.fr/en/welcome.html
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Related research

Keywords: Philippines; Risk management in business; income; management; social networks; social groups; rural poor; income;

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Cited by:
  1. Yanos Zylberberg, 2010. "Do tropical typhoons smash community ties? Theory and evidence from Vietnam," PSE Working Papers halshs-00564941, HAL.
  2. Richard Baldwin & Dany Jaimovich, 2010. "Are Free Trade Agreements Contagious?," NBER Working Papers 16084, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Eleonora Patacchini & Yves Zenou, 2012. "Ethnic Networks and Employment Outcomes," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1202, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  4. Das, Maitreyi Bordia, 2008. "Minority status and labor market outcomes : does india have minority enclaves ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4653, The World Bank.
  5. Federica MARZO & Fabrice MURTIN, 2009. "HIV/AIDS and Poverty in South Africa : A Bayesian Estimation," Working Papers 2009-12, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.
  6. repec:dgr:uvatin:2011072 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Jaromir Kovarik & Marco J. van der Leij, 2011. "Risk Aversion and Social Networks," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-072/1, Tinbergen Institute.
  8. Moritz Müller & Robin COWAN & Geert Duysters & Nicolas JONARD, 2009. "Knowledge Structures," Working Papers of BETA 2009-24, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
  9. Mazzucato, Valentina, 2009. "Informal Insurance Arrangements in Ghanaian Migrants' Transnational Networks: The Role of Reverse Remittances and Geographic Proximity," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1105-1115, June.
  10. Yanos Zylberberg, 2010. "Do tropical typhoons smash community ties? Theory and evidence from Vietnam," Working Papers halshs-00564941, HAL.

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