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Nouvelles technologies et nouvelles formes d’organisation du travail. Quelles conséquences pour l’emploi des salariés âgés ?

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  • Roger, Muriel
  • Aubert, Patrick
  • Caroli, Eve

Abstract

To investigate the relationships between new technologies, innovative workplace practices and the age structure of the workforce we start from a classical labour-demand framework, assuming that the cost function is a restricted translog. Since we are interested in age effects, the only variable inputs are different types of labour indexed first by age and second by age and occupational groups. The data we use come from several French datasets: the c.o.i. survey and the dads and brn files. We find evidence that the wage bill share of older workers decreases when new technologies are adopted.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Paris Dauphine University in its series Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine with number 123456789/10090.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Publication status: Published in Revue Economique, 2006, Vol. 57, no. 6. pp. 1329-1349.Length: 20 pages
Handle: RePEc:dau:papers:123456789/10090

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Keywords: Main-d’œuvre; Changements organisationnel; Nouvelles technologies; économie du travail;

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References

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  1. Patrick Aubert & Eve Caroli & Muriel Roger, 2006. "New technologies, organisation and age: firm-level evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(509), pages F73-F93, 02.
  2. Leora Friedberg, 2001. "The Impact of Technological Change on Older Workers: Evidence from Data on Computer Use," NBER Working Papers 8297, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Timothy F. Bresnahan & Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 1999. "Information Technology, Workplace Organization and the Demand for Skilled Labor: Firm-Level Evidence," NBER Working Papers 7136, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. P. Biscourp & B. Crépon & T. Heckel & N. Riedinger, 2002. "How do firms respond to cheaper computers? Microeconometric evidence for France based on a production function approach," Documents de Travail de la DESE - Working Papers of the DESE g2002-05, Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques, DESE.
  5. Eve Caroli & John Van Reenen, 2001. "Skill-Biased Organizational Change? Evidence From A Panel Of British And French Establishments," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 116(4), pages 1449-1492, November.
  6. Berman, Eli & Bound, John & Griliches, Zvi, 1994. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U.S. Manufacturing: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufactures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(2), pages 367-97, May.
  7. Aubert Patrick & Caroli Eve & Roger Muriel, 2005. "New Technologies, Workplace Organisation and the Age Structure of the Workforce: Firm-Level Evidence," Research Unit Working Papers 0505, Laboratoire d'Economie Appliquee, INRA.
  8. Borghans,Lex & Weel,Bas,ter, 2002. "Do Older Workers Have More Trouble Using a Computer Than Younger Workers?," ROA Research Memorandum 003, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  9. James Heckman, 2000. "Policies to Foster Human Capital," Working Papers 0028, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
  10. Luc Behaghel & Nathalie Greenan, 2005. "Training and Age-Biased Technical Change : Evidence from French Micro Data," Working Papers 2005-06, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.
  11. Nathalie Greenan, 2003. "Organisational change, technology, employment and skills: an empirical study of French manufacturing," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(2), pages 287-316, March.
  12. David Blanchflower & Simon Burgess, 1996. "New Technology and Jobs: Comparative Evidence from a Two Country Study," CEP Discussion Papers dp0285, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  13. Michel Gollac & Nathalie Greenan & Sylvie Hamon-Cholet, 2000. "L'informatisation de l'« ancienne » économie : nouvelles machines, nouvelles organisations et nouveaux travailleurs," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 339(1), pages 171-201.
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Cited by:
  1. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/6144 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Sandrine Levasseur, 2008. "Progrès technologique et employabilité des seniors," Sciences Po publications 2008-16, Sciences Po.
  3. Sandrine Levasseur, 2008. "Progrès technologique et employabilité des seniors," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 0(3), pages 155-184.

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