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Household Incomes, Poverty and Inequality in a Multivariate Framework

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  • Ingrid Woolard
  • Murray Leibbrandt

    ()
    (Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town)

Abstract

The existing work on household poverty and inequality in South Africa has shown that poverty and inequality differ markedly by race, location, education, gender of the head, household demographics and household labour market participation. The models confirm the ongoing importance of race as a fundamental factor structuring South African poverty and inequality even after the influence of all the other poverty and inequality correlates are accounted for. As far as possible, the analysis compared in-migrants to non-migrants and intra-Gauteng migrants in order to provide insight into special benefits or challenges that in-migrant households may present. The Labour Force Survey module on migrant labour allowed the profiling of migrant labourers and the approximation of economic links between Gauteng and other provinces as represented by remittances. The study found that a large proportion of Gauteng residents were born outside the province, or moved into the province in the inter-census period, indicating a relatively mobile population.

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File URL: http://www.dpru.uct.ac.za/sites/default/files/image_tool/images/36/DPRU%20WP99-031.pdf
File Function: First version, 1999
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit in its series Working Papers with number 99031.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Dec 1999
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Working Paper Series by the Development Policy Research Unit, December 1999, pages 1-27
Handle: RePEc:ctw:wpaper:99031

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Related research

Keywords: South Africa: household labour market participation; household poverty; inequality; race; location; education; gender of the head;

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References

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  1. Murray Leibbrandt & Haroon Bhorat, 1999. "Correlates of Vulnerability in the South African Labour Market," Working Papers 99027, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
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Cited by:
  1. Sten Dieden, 2003. "Integration into the South African Core Economy: Household Level Covariates," SALDRU/CSSR Working Papers 054, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  2. Murray Leibbrandt & Ingrid Woolard, 2001. "The labour market and household income inequality in South Africa: existing evidence and new panel data," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(6), pages 671-689.
  3. Anna McCord & Dirk Ernst van Seventer, 2004. "The economy-wide impacts of the labour intensification of infrastructure expenditure in South Africa," SALDRU/CSSR Working Papers 093, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  4. Michael Rogan, 2012. "Poverty and headship in post-apartheid South Africa, 1997-2008," Working Papers 288, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  5. Anna McCord, 2004. "Public works: Policy expectations and programme realities," SALDRU/CSSR Working Papers 079, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  6. Anna McCord & Kate Wilkinson, 2009. "Assessing the Incidence of Public Works Programmes: Using Propensity Score Matching Techniques to Assess the Poverty Targeting of Employment in Two Public Works Programmes in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 31, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  7. Nanak Kakwani & Hyun H. Son & Richard Hinz, 2006. "Poverty, Old-Age and Social Pensions in Kenya," Working Papers 24, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  8. Pauw, Kalie, 2005. "Forming Representative Household and Factor Groups for a South African SAM," Technical Paper Series 15620, PROVIDE Project.

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