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Disentangling the demographic determinants of the English take-off : 1530-1860

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  • Raouf, BOUCEKKINE

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Department of Economics)

  • David, DE LA CROIX

    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Department of Economics)

  • Dominique, PEETERS

Abstract

We propose a model with some of the main demographic, economic and institutional factors usually considered to matter in the transition to modern growth. We apply our theory to England over the period 1530-1860. We use the model to measure the impact of mortality, population density and technological progress on school foundations, literacy and growth through a set of experiments. We find that one third of the rise in literacy over the period 1530-1850 can be directly related to the rise in population density, while one sixth is linked to higher longevity and one half to exogenous total factor productivity growth. Moreover, the timing of the effect of population density in the model is consistent with the available evidence for England, where it is shown that schools were established at a high rate over the period 1540-1620.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques in its series Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) with number 2007019.

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Length: 36
Date of creation: 01 Jul 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvec:2007019

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  1. Galor, Oded & Weil, David, 1998. "Population, Technology and Growth: From the Malthusian Regime to the Demographic Transition," CEPR Discussion Papers 1981, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Gary D. Hansen & Edward C. Prescott, 1998. "Malthus to Solow," NBER Working Papers 6858, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. BOUCEKKINE, Raouf & PEETERS, Dominique & de la CROIX, David, . "Early literacy achievements, population density and the transition to modern growth," CORE Discussion Papers RP -1911, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  4. Oded Galor, 2004. "From Stagnation to Growth: Unified Growth Theory," GE, Growth, Math methods 0409003, EconWPA.
  5. Nils-Petter Lagerl–f, 2003. "From Malthus to Modern Growth: Can Epidemics Explain the Three Regimes?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(2), pages 755-777, 05.
  6. Raouf Boucekkine & David de la Croix & Omar Licandro, . "vintage human capital, demographic trends and endogenous growth," Working Papers 2000-02, FEDEA.
  7. Matthias Doepke, 2004. "Accounting for Fertility Decline During the Transition to Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 347-383, 09.
  8. ReVelle, C. S. & Eiselt, H. A., 2005. "Location analysis: A synthesis and survey," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 165(1), pages 1-19, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Joerg Baten & Jan Zanden, 2008. "Book production and the onset of modern economic growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 217-235, September.
  2. Alexandra M. de Pleijt & Jan Luiten van Zanden, 2013. "Accounting for the ‘Little Divergence’ What drove economic growth in preindustrial Europe, 1300-1800?," Working Papers 0046, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
  3. BOUCEKKINE, Raouf & DIENE, Bity & AZOMAHOU, Théophile, . "Growth economics of epidemics: A review of the theory," CORE Discussion Papers RP -2004, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).

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