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Jobs, Skills and Incomes in Ghana: How was poverty halved?

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  • Nicholas Nsowah-Nuamah
  • Francis Teal
  • Moses Awoonor-Williams

Abstract

Poverty has halved in Ghana over the period from 1991 to 2005. Our objective in this paper is to assess how far this fall was linked to the creation of better paying jobs and the increase in education. We find that earnings rose rapidly in the period from 1998 to 2005, by 64% for men and by 55% for women. While education, particularly at the post secondary level, is associated with far higher earnings there is no evidence that the increase in earnings that occurred over the period from1998 to 2005 is due to increased returns to education or increased levels of education. In contrast there is very strong evidence, for all levels of education, that the probability of having a public sector job approximately halved over the period from 1991 while the probability of having a job in a small firm increased very substantially. In 1991/92 a male worker with secondary education had a 7 per cent probability of being employed in a small firm, by 2005/06 this had increased to 20 per cent which was higher than the probability of being employed by the public sector. Employment in small firms, which is the low paying occupation within the urban sector, increased from 2.7 to 6.7 percent of the population, an increase from 225,000 to 886,000 employees. Jobs in total have been increasing in line with the population but the proportion of relatively low paying ones increased markedly from 1998/99 to 2005/06. The rises in income that occurred over this period were due almost entirely to increases in earnings rates, for given levels of education, across all job types particularly among the unskilled. Why unskilled earnings rates rose so rapidly is unclear.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford in its series CSAE Working Paper Series with number 2010-01.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:csa:wpaper:2010-01

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  1. Steve Bond & Asli Leblebicioglu & Fabio Schiantarelli, 2004. "Capital Accumulation and Growth: A New Look at the Empirical Evidence," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 591, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 02 Aug 2007.
  2. Måns Söderbom & Francis Teal, 2004. "Size and Efficiency in African Manufacturing Firms:Evidence from Firm-Level Panel Data," Development and Comp Systems 0409010, EconWPA.
  3. Geeta Gandhi Kingdon & John Knight, 2006. "How flexible are wages in response to local unemployment in South Africa?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 59(3), pages 471-495, April.
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Cited by:
  1. Kolavalli, Shashi & Robinson, Elizabeth J. Z. & Diao, Xinshen & Alpuerto, Vida & Folledo, Renato & Slavova, Mira & Ngeleza, Guyslain K. & Asante, Felix Ankomah, 2012. "Economic transformation in Ghana: Where will the path lead?," IFPRI discussion papers 1161, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Francis Teal, 2010. "Higher Education and Economic Development in Africa: a Review of Channels and Interactions," CSAE Working Paper Series 2010-25, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

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