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Public Service Provision, User Fees, and Political Turmoil

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  • Marcel Fafchamps
  • Bart Minten

Abstract

Following an electoral dispute, the central highlands of the island of Madagascar were subjected to an economic blockade during the Þrst half of 2002. After the blockade ended in June 2002, user fees for health services and school fees were progressively eliminated. This paper examines the provision of schooling and health services to rural areas of Madagascar before, during, and after the blockade. We Þnd that public services were more resilient to the blockade than initially anticipated, but that health services were more affected than schools. The removal of user fees had a large signiÞcant effect on public services that is distinct from the end of the blockade and the increase in school book provision.

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Paper provided by Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford in its series CSAE Working Paper Series with number 2003-15.

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Date of creation: 2003
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Handle: RePEc:csa:wpaper:2003-15

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  1. Lisa A. Cameron, 2001. "The Impact of the Indonesian Financial Crisis on Children: An analysis using the 100 villages data," Innocenti Working Papers, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre inwopa01/10, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.
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  4. Alderman, Harold & Orazem, Peter & Paterno, Elizabeth M., 2001. "School Quality, School Cost, and the Public/Private School Choices of Low-Income Households in Pakistan," Staff General Research Papers, Iowa State University, Department of Economics 1970, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  5. Jacoby, Hanan G & Skoufias, Emmanuel, 1997. "Risk, Financial Markets, and Human Capital in a Developing Country," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(3), pages 311-35, July.
  6. Sahn, David & Bernier, Rene, 1995. "Have structural adjustments led to health sector reform in Africa?," Health Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 32(1-3), pages 193-214.
  7. Marcel Fafchamps & Bart Minten, 2002. "Crime and Poverty: Evidence From a Natural Experiment," Economics Series Working Papers, University of Oxford, Department of Economics WPS/2002-23, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  8. Glick, Peter & Sahn, David E., 2006. "The demand for primary schooling in Madagascar: Price, quality, and the choice between public and private providers," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 118-145, February.
  9. Behrman, Jere R & Knowles, James C, 1999. "Household Income and Child Schooling in Vietnam," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, World Bank Group, vol. 13(2), pages 211-56, May.
  10. Cameron, Lisa A., 2002. "The impact of the Indonesian financial crisis on children : data from 100 villages survey," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 2799, The World Bank.
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  13. Deininger, Klaus, 2003. "Does cost of schooling affect enrollment by the poor? Universal primary education in Uganda," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 291-305, June.
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Cited by:
  1. Robilliard, Anne-Sophie & Rakotomanana, Faly & Nordman, Christophe Jalil, 2010. "Gender Disparities in the Malagasy Labour Market," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine, Paris Dauphine University 123456789/4304, Paris Dauphine University.
  2. Lay, Jann, 2010. "MDG achievements, determinants and resource needs : what has been learnt ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 5320, The World Bank.
  3. Ridde, Valéry & Diarra, Aïssa & Moha, Mahaman, 2011. "User fees abolition policy in Niger: Comparing the under five years exemption implementation in two districts," Health Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 99(3), pages 219-225, March.
  4. Anna S. Brink & Steven F. Koch, 2013. "The 1996 User Fee Abolition in South Africa: A Difference-in-Difference Analysis," Working Papers, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics 201332, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.

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