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Adoption and diffusion of agricultural innovations in Ethiopia: the role of Education

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  • Sharada Weir
  • John Knight

Abstract

Schooling has been shown to provide substantial externality benefits by increasing farm output and shifting the production frontier outwards. This paper investigates the role of schooling at the household- and site-levels in the adoption and diffusion of agricultural innovations in rural Ethiopia. We find that household-level education is important to the timing of adoption but less crucial to the question of whether a household has ever adopted fertiliser, i.e., early innovators tend to be educated and to be copied by those who adopt later, obscuring the relationship between education and adoption at the household-level. By contrast, site-level education appears not to affect the timing of an innovation’s introduction to the site, but does influence the extent of diffusion. Thus, there are two externality effects: educated farmers are early innovators, providing an example which may be copied by lesseducated farmers; and educated farmers are better able to copy those who innovate first, enhancing diffusion of the new technology more widely within the site.

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Paper provided by Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford in its series CSAE Working Paper Series with number 2000-05.

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Date of creation: 2000
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Handle: RePEc:csa:wpaper:2000-05

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References

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  1. Mark Rosenzweig & Andrew D. Foster, . "Technical Change and Human Capital Returns and Investments: Evidence from the Green Revolution," Home Pages, University of Pennsylvania _065, University of Pennsylvania.
  2. Ellison, Glenn & Fudenberg, Drew, 1993. "Rules of Thumb for Social Learning," Scholarly Articles 3196332, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  3. Sharada Weir, 1999. "The effects of education on farmer productivity in rural Ethiopia," CSAE Working Paper Series, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford 1999-07, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  4. Banerjee, Abhijit V, 1992. "A Simple Model of Herd Behavior," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 107(3), pages 797-817, August.
  5. Jamison, Dean T. & Moock, Peter R., 1984. "Farmer education and farm efficiency in Nepal: The role of schooling, extension services, and cognitive skills," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 67-86, January.
  6. Mark Rosenzweig & Andrew D. Foster, . "Learning by Doing and Learning from Others: Human Capital and Technical Change in Agriculture," Home Pages, University of Pennsylvania _068, University of Pennsylvania.
  7. Kees Burger & Paul Collier & Jan Willem Gunning, 1993. "Social learning: an application to Kenyan agriculture," CSAE Working Paper Series, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford 1993-05, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  8. Basu, Kaushik & Foster, James E., 1998. "On measuring literacy," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 1997, The World Bank.
  9. John Knight & Sharada Weir & Tassew Woldehanna, 2003. "The role of education in facilitating risk-taking and innovation in agriculture," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(6), pages 1-22.
  10. Sharada Weir & John Knight, 2000. "Education externalities in rural Ethiopia: evidence from average and stochastic frontier production functions," CSAE Working Paper Series, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford 2000-04, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  11. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-98, January.
  12. Besley, Timothy & Case, Anne, 1993. "Modeling Technology Adoption in Developing Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 83(2), pages 396-402, May.
  13. Shujie Yao, 1996. "The determinants of cereal crop productivity of the peasant farm sector in Ethiopia, 1981-87," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(1), pages 69-82.
  14. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G., 1993. "Estimation and Inference in Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, number 9780195060119, October.
  15. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Sharada Weir, 2000. "Intergenerational Transfers of Human Capital: Evidence on Two Types of Education Externalities," Economics Series Working Papers, University of Oxford, Department of Economics WPS/2000-15, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  2. John Knight & Sharada Weir, 2000. "Education Externalities in Rural Ethiopia: Evidence from Average and Stochastic Frontier Production Functions," Economics Series Working Papers, University of Oxford, Department of Economics WPS/2000-04, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  3. Sonia Bhalotra & Christopher Heady, 2003. "Child Farm Labor: The Wealth Paradox," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, World Bank Group, vol. 17(2), pages 197-227, December.
  4. Sharada Weir, 2000. "Intergenerational transfers of human capital: evidence on two types of education externalities," CSAE Working Paper Series, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford 2000-15, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  5. Odendo, Martins & Obare, Gideon A. & Salasya, Beatrice, 2010. "Determinants of the Speed of Adoption of Soil Fertility-Enhancing Technologies in Western Kenya," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE);Agricultural Economics Association of South Afri 96192, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE);Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
  6. Wilfred Nyangena, 2008. "Social determinants of soil and water conservation in rural Kenya," Environment, Development and Sustainability, Springer, Springer, vol. 10(6), pages 745-767, December.
  7. Conto, Francesco & Fiore, Mariantonietta & La Sala, Piermichele & Papapietro, Paolo, 2012. "The Role Of Education, Knowledge And Human Resources For The Agricultural Development In The Perspective Of New Cap: An Hypothesis Of Change In Basilicata," APSTRACT: Applied Studies in Agribusiness and Commerce, AGRIMBA, AGRIMBA, vol. 6.
  8. Wobst, Peter & Arndt, Channing, 2003. "HIV/AIDS and Primary School Performance in Tanzania," 2003 Annual Meeting, August 16-22, 2003, Durban, South Africa, International Association of Agricultural Economists 25870, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  9. World Bank, 2005. "Ethiopia : Well-Being and Poverty in Ethiopia, The Role of Agriculture and Agency," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8707, The World Bank.
  10. World Bank, 2005. "Education in Ethiopia : Strengthening the Foundation for Sustainable Progress," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7434, August.
  11. Christian K.M. Kingombe, 2012. "The Linkage between Outcome Differences in Cotton Production and Rural Roads Improvements - A Matching Approach," IHEID Working Papers, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies 12-2012, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
  12. Tavneet Suri, 2006. "Selection and Comparative Advantage in Technology Adoption," Working Papers, Economic Growth Center, Yale University 944, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  13. Tavneet Suri, 2009. "Selection and Comparative Advantage in Technology Adoption," NBER Working Papers 15346, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Zavale, Helder & Mabaya, Edward T. & Christy, Ralph D., 2005. "Adoption of Improved Maize Seed by Smallholder Farmers in Mozambique," Staff Papers, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management 121065, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  15. Matthias Grossmann (SKOPE) and Mark Poston (DFID), . "Skill Needs and Policies for Agriculture-led Pro-poor Development," QEH Working Papers, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford qehwps112, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.

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