Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Are Older Workers Responding To The Bear Market?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Andy Eschtruth

    ()
    (Center for Retirement Research)

  • Jonathan Gemus

Abstract

In the past year, as the economy has weakened and unemployment has risen, the labor force participation rate for older workers (aged 55-64) has jumped by 2.0 percentage points - an increase unprecedented in post-war U.S. economic history. Recessions typically see very slow or even negative growth in labor force participation. A likely factor contributing to this dramatic change is the steep decline in the stock market that has occurred since the spring of 2000. Plunging stock portfolios may have caused some older workers to postpone retirement and convinced some early retirees to rejoin the labor force.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://crr.bc.edu/briefs/are-older-workers-responding-to-the-bear-market/
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Center for Retirement Research in its series Just the Facts with number jtf-5.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Sep 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:crr:jusfac:jtf-5

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Hovey House, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467
Phone: (617) 552-1762
Fax: (617) 552-0191
Email:
Web page: http://crr.bc.edu/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Vincenzo Galasso, 2012. "The Political Feasibility of Postponing Retirement," CESifo DICE Report, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 10(4), pages 27-31, December.
  2. Courtney C. Coile & Phillip B. Levine, 2006. "Bulls, bears, and retirement behavior," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 59(3), pages 408-429, April.
  3. Mário Centeno & Márcio Corrêa, 2006. "Job Matching, Unexpected Obligations And Retirement Decisions," Anais do XXXIV Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 34th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 159, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
  4. Alicia H. Munnell & Dan Muldoon & Steven A. Sass, 2009. "Recessions and Older Workers," Issues in Brief ib2009-9-2, Center for Retirement Research, revised Jan 2009.
  5. Alicia H. Munnell & Steven A. Sass, 2007. "The Labor Supply of Older Americans," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2007-12, Center for Retirement Research, revised Jun 2007.
  6. Lucie Schmidt & Purvi Sevak, 2006. "Taxes, Wages, and the Labor Supply of Older Americans," Working Papers wp139, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  7. Hinrichs, Karl, 2004. "Active Citizens and Retirement Planning: Enlarging Freedom of Choice in the Course of Pension Reforms in Nordic Countries and Germany," Working papers of the ZeS 11/2004, University of Bremen, Centre for Social Policy Research (ZeS).

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:crr:jusfac:jtf-5. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Amy Grzybowski) or (Christopher F Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.