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Is academic patenting detrimental to high quality research? An empirical analysis of the relationship between scientific careers and patent applications

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Author Info

  • Mario Calderini

    (DSPEA, Polytechnic of Turin,)

  • Chiara Franzoni

    (University of Bergamo and CERIS (CNR),)

Abstract

Universities are increasingly concerned with patents and commercialization of internal research. One of the possible dangers of academic patenting is to divert researchers from long-term-oriented research and to delay the publication of results in open science. The question of unintended consequences of technology transfer and crowd-out effect is a critical issue when trying to foster technical change and ensure provision of top quality research in the long run. Nevertheless, little evidence has been provided until now to support either view. The aim of this paper is to search for evidence of rivalry between academic patenting and scientific research in a panel of 1323 researchers along 30 years. Drawing on bibliometrics, biographical and patent data of a sample of (tenured and untenured) publicly-funded researchers working in the fields of Engineering Chemistry and Nanotechnologies for New Materials, we implement two econometric models in order to understand if patenting and inventing is likely to affect the quantity and the quality of publications in a researcher’s career. Results show that the occurrence of a patent is positively associated with the quality of previous and the quantity of later scientific publications.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by KITeS, Centre for Knowledge, Internationalization and Technology Studies, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy in its series KITeS Working Papers with number 162.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2004
Date of revision: Oct 2004
Handle: RePEc:cri:cespri:wp162

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Keywords: academic patenting; policy of research; technology transfer.;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Can Huang & Ad Notten & Nico Rasters, 2011. "Nanoscience and technology publications and patents: a review of social science studies and search strategies," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 145-172, April.
  2. Lee Davis & Maria Larsen & Peter Lotz, 2011. "Scientists’ perspectives concerning the effects of university patenting on the conduct of academic research in the life sciences," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 14-37, February.
  3. Dirk Czarnitzki & Katrin Hussinger & Cédric Schneider, 2012. "The nexus between science and industry: evidence from faculty inventions," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 37(5), pages 755-776, October.
  4. Beaudry, Catherine & Allaoui, Sedki, 2012. "Impact of public and private research funding on scientific production: The case of nanotechnology," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(9), pages 1589-1606.
  5. Albert Banal-Estañol & Inés Macho-Stadler & David Pérez-Castrillo, 2011. "Research Output from University-Industry Collaborative Projects," Working Papers 539, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  6. Larsen, Maria Theresa, 2011. "The implications of academic enterprise for public science: An overview of the empirical evidence," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 6-19, February.
  7. Mario Calderini & Chiara Franzoni & Andrea Vezzulli, 2005. "If Star Scientist do no Patent: an Event History Analysis of Scientific Eminence and the Decision to Patent in the Academic World," UNIMI - Research Papers in Economics, Business, and Statistics unimi-1004, Universitá degli Studi di Milano.
  8. Van Looy, Bart & Landoni, Paolo & Callaert, Julie & van Pottelsberghe, Bruno & Sapsalis, Eleftherios & Debackere, Koenraad, 2011. "Entrepreneurial effectiveness of European universities: An empirical assessment of antecedents and trade-offs," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 553-564, May.
  9. Meyer, Martin, 2006. "Are patenting scientists the better scholars?: An exploratory comparison of inventor-authors with their non-inventing peers in nano-science and technology," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(10), pages 1646-1662, December.
  10. Carlos Rosell & Ajay Agrawal, 2006. "University Patenting: Estimating the Diminishing Breadth of Knowledge Diffusion and Consumption," NBER Working Papers 12640, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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