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Weather and Infant Mortality in Africa

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  • Kudamatsu, Masayuki
  • Persson, Torsten
  • Strömberg, David

Abstract

We estimate how random weather fluctuations affected infant mortality across 28 African countries in the past, combining high-resolution data from retrospective fertility surveys (DHS) and climate-model reanalysis (ERA-40). We find that infants were much more likely to die when exposed in utero to much longer malaria spells than normal in epidemic malaria regions, and to droughts in arid areas, especially when born in the hungry season. Based on these estimates, we predict aggregate infant deaths in Africa, due to extreme weather events and to maternal malaria in epidemic areas for 1981-2000 and 2081-2100.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 9222.

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Date of creation: Nov 2012
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:9222

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Keywords: climate change; maternal malaria; maternal malnutrition; natural experiments;

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Cited by:
  1. Alem, Yonas & Colmer, Jonathan, 2013. "Optimal Expectations and the Welfare Cost of Climate Variability," Working Papers in Economics 578, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  2. Broner, Fernando A & Bustos, Paula & Carvalho, Vasco M, 2012. "Sources of Comparative Advantage in Polluting Industries," CEPR Discussion Papers 9111, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Rabassa, Mariano & Skoufias, Emmanuel & Jacoby, Hanan G., 2012. "Weather and child health in rural Nigeria," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6214, The World Bank.
  4. Gabriel Picone & Robyn Kibler & Benedicte Apouey, 2013. "Individuals’ Preventive Behavioral Response to Changes in Malaria Risks and Government Interventions: Evidence from six African countries," Working Papers 0313, University of South Florida, Department of Economics.
  5. Christian Almer & Stefan Boes, 2012. "Climate (change) and conflict: resolving a puzzle of association and causation," Diskussionsschriften dp1203, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
  6. Burke, Marshall & Gong, Erick & Jones, Kelly M., 2013. "Income Shocks and HIV in Africa," MPRA Paper 55392, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Sheetal Sekhri & Adam Storeygard, 2013. "Dowry Deaths: Consumption Smoothing in Response to Climate Variability in India," Virginia Economics Online Papers 407, University of Virginia, Department of Economics.
  8. Rocha, Rudi & Soares, Rodrigo R., 2012. "Water Scarcity and Birth Outcomes in the Brazilian Semiarid," IZA Discussion Papers 6773, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Margherita Calderone & Jean-Francois Maystadt & Liangzhi You, 2013. "Local Warming and Violent Conflict in North and South Sudan," HiCN Working Papers 149, Households in Conflict Network.
  10. Jonathan Colmer, 2013. "Climate Variability, Child Labour and Schooling: Evidence on the Intensive and Extensive Margin," Working Papers 2013.81, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  11. Jonathan Colmer, 2013. "Climate Variability, Child Labour and Schooling: Evidence on the Intensive and Extensive Margin," Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment Working Papers 132, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
  12. Almer, Christian & Laurent-Lucchetti, Jérémy & oechslin, Manuel, 2011. "Income shocks and social unrest: theory and evidence," MPRA Paper 34426, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  13. Waage Skjeflo, Sofie & Bruvik Westberg, Nina, 2014. "Learning the hard way? Adapting to climate risk in Tanzania," CLTS Working Papers 4/14, Centre for Land Tenure Studies, Norwegian University of Life Sciences.
  14. Melissa Dell & Benjamin F. Jones & Benjamin A. Olken, 2013. "What Do We Learn from the Weather? The New Climate-Economy Literature," NBER Working Papers 19578, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Fernando Broner & Paula Bustos & Vasco Carvalho, 2011. "Sources of comparative advantage in polluting industries (with appendix)," Economics Working Papers 1331, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Mar 2013.

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