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Fiscal expansions affect unemployment, but they may increase it

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  • Brückner, Markus
  • Pappa, Evi

Abstract

Evidence from structural VARs suggests that the unemployment rate significantly increases following increases in government expenditures in many OECD countries. Results hold for a variety of specifications and identification schemes. Fiscal expansions also tend to increase the participation rate, vacancies, real wages and employment while they do not affect significantly labor market tightness. Existing models have difficulties in generating such responses. We introduce insider and outsider workers and a labor force participation choice into a New Keynesian model with matching frictions and show that calibrated versions of the model can generate the empirical regularities.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 7766.

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Date of creation: Mar 2010
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:7766

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Related research

Keywords: insiders-outsiders; matching frictions; participation rate; SVAR; unemployment;

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References

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  1. Evi Pappa, 2009. "The effects of fiscal expansions: an international comparison," Working Papers 409, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  2. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
  3. Mountford, Andrew & Uhlig, Harald, 2002. "What are the Effects of Fiscal Policy Shocks?," CEPR Discussion Papers 3338, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Andolfatto, David, 1996. "Business Cycles and Labor-Market Search," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(1), pages 112-32, March.
  5. Morten O. Ravn & Saverio Simonelli, 2007. "Labor Market Dynamics and the Business Cycle: Structural Evidence for the United States," Economics Working Papers ECO2007/13, European University Institute.
  6. Linnemann, Ludger & Schabert, Andreas, 2003. " Fiscal Policy in the New Neoclassical Synthesis," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 35(6), pages 911-29, December.
  7. Karel Mertens & MortenO. Ravn, 2010. "Measuring the Impact of Fiscal Policy in the Face of Anticipation: A Structural VAR Approach," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(544), pages 393-413, 05.
  8. Mortensen, Dale T & Pissarides, Christopher A, 1994. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 397-415, July.
  9. Carlos Thomas, 2006. "Search and matching frictions and optimal monetary policy," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19782, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  10. Tommaso Monacelli & Roberto Perotti & Antonella Trigari, 2010. "Unemployment Fiscal Multipliers," NBER Working Papers 15931, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Hansen, Gary D., 1985. "Indivisible labor and the business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 309-327, November.
  12. Fabio Canova & Evi Pappa, 2007. "Price Differentials in Monetary Unions: The Role of Fiscal Shocks," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(520), pages 713-737, 04.
  13. Morten O. Ravn, 2006. "The Consumption-Tightness Puzzle," NBER Working Papers 12421, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Robert E. Hall, 2005. "Employment Fluctuations with Equilibrium Wage Stickiness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 50-65, March.
  15. Olivier Blanchard & Justin Wolfers, 1999. "The Role of Shocks and Institutions in the Rise of European Unemployment: The Aggregate Evidence," NBER Working Papers 7282, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Merz, Monika, 1995. "Search in the labor market and the real business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 269-300, November.
  17. Garey Ramey & Wouter J. den Haan & Joel Watson, 2000. "Job Destruction and Propagation of Shocks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 482-498, June.
  18. Farmer, Roger E A, 2009. "Fiscal Policy Can Reduce Unemployment: But There is a Better Alternative," CEPR Discussion Papers 7526, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  19. Evi Pappa, 2009. "The Effects Of Fiscal Shocks On Employment And The Real Wage," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 50(1), pages 217-244, 02.
  20. Campolmi, Alessia & Faia, Ester, 2006. "Cyclical inflation divergence and different labor market institutions in the EMU," Working Paper Series 0619, European Central Bank.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Steinar Holden & Victoria Sparrman, 2011. "Do Government Purchases Affect Unemployment?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3482, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Cristiano Cantore & Paul Levine & Giovanni Melina, 2013. "A Fiscal Stimulus and Jobless Recovery," IMF Working Papers 13/17, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Schumacher, Ingmar, 2014. "On the self-fulfilling prophecy of changes in sovereign ratings," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 351-356.
  4. Valerie A. Ramey, 2012. "Government Spending and Private Activity," NBER Chapters, in: Fiscal Policy after the Financial Crisis, pages 19-55 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Javier Andrés & José Emilio Boscá & Javier Ferri, 2011. "Household Leverage and Fiscal Multipliers," Working Papers 1103, International Economics Institute, University of Valencia.

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