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Financial Crisis, Economic Recovery and Banking Development in Former Soviet Union Economies

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  • Huang, Haizhou
  • Marin, Dalia
  • Xu, Cheng-Gang

Abstract

This Paper explains both the onset of the financial crisis in 1998 and the striking economic recovery afterwards in Russia and other Former Soviet Union (FSU) economies. Before the crisis banks do not lend to the real sector of the economy, and firms use non-bank finance - including trade credits and barter trade - to finance production. The banking failure arises due to the coexistence of adverse selection in a lemons credit market jointly with high government borrowing. The collapse of the treasury bills market in the financial crisis of August 1998 triggers a change in banks' lending behaviour. As a result output recovers which provides initial conditions for banking development.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 3794.

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Date of creation: Feb 2003
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3794

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Keywords: banking development; institutional trap; non-banking finance;

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References

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  1. Erik Berglof & Patrick Bolton, 2002. "The Great Divide and Beyond: Financial Architecture in Transition," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 77-100, Winter.
  2. Loayza, Norman V. & Ranciere, Romain, 2006. "Financial Development, Financial Fragility, and Growth," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(4), pages 1051-1076, June.
  3. Marin, Dalia & Kaufmann, Daniel & Gorochowskij, Bogdan, 2000. "Barter in Transition Economies: Competing Explanations Confront Ukrainian Data," Discussion Papers in Economics 63, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  4. Dalia Marin & Monika Schnitzer, 1999. "Disorganization and Financial Collapse," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 285, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  5. Blanchard, Olivier & Kremer, Michael, 1997. "Disorganization," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1091-1126, November.
  6. Perotti, Enrico, 2002. "Lessons from the Russian Meltdown: The Economics of Soft Legal Constraints," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 5(3), pages 359-99, Winter.
  7. Reinhart, Carmen & Kaminsky, Graciela, 1999. "The twin crises: The causes of banking and balance of payments problems," MPRA Paper 14081, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Prakash Loungani & Paolo Mauro, 2001. "Capital Flight from Russia," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(5), pages 689-706, 05.
  9. Guillermo Calvo & Fabrizio Coricelli, 1992. "Output Collapse in Eastern Europe," IMF Working Papers 92/64, International Monetary Fund.
  10. Gelfer, Stanislav & Perotti, Enrico C, 1999. "Red Barons or Robber Barons? Governance and Financing in Russian FIG," CEPR Discussion Papers 2204, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  11. Ratna Sahay & Deepak Mishra & Poonam Gupta, 2003. "Output Response to Currency Crises," IMF Working Papers 03/230, International Monetary Fund.
  12. Dalia Marin & Monika Schnitzer, 2002. "Contracts in Trade and Transition: The Resurgence of Barter," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262133997, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Khilji, Bashir Ahmad & Farrukh, Muhammad Umer & Iqbal, Mammona & Hameed, Shahzad, 2010. "The Impact of Recent Financial Recession on the Banking sector of Pakistan," MPRA Paper 30558, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 05 Jan 2011.
  2. José Noguera & Susan J. Linz, 2005. "Barter, Credit, and Welfare: A theoretical inquiry into the barter phenomenon in Russia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp757, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.

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