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Forecast Evaluation with Shared Data Sets

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  • Sullivan, Ryan
  • Timmermann, Allan G
  • White, Halbert

Abstract

Data sharing is common practice in forecasting experiments in situations where fresh data samples are difficult or expensive to generate. This means that forecasters often analyze the same data set using a host of different models and sets of explanatory variables. This practice introduces statistical dependencies across forecasting studies that can severely distort statistical inference. Here we examine a new and inexpensive recursive bootstrap procedure that allows forecasters to account explicitly for these dependencies. The procedure allows forecasters to merge empirical evidence and draw inference in the light of previously accumulated results. In an empirical example, we merge results from predictions of daily stock prices based on (1) technical trading rules and (2) calendar rules, demonstrating both the significance of problems arising from data sharing and the simplicity of accounting for data sharing using these new methods.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 3060.

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Date of creation: Nov 2001
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3060

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Related research

Keywords: bootstrap; calendar effects; data sharing; forecast evaluation; technical trading;

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References

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  1. Diebold, Francis X & Mariano, Roberto S, 2002. "Comparing Predictive Accuracy," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 134-44, January.
  2. Whitney K. Newey & Kenneth D. West, 1986. "A Simple, Positive Semi-Definite, Heteroskedasticity and AutocorrelationConsistent Covariance Matrix," NBER Technical Working Papers 0055, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Sullivan, Ryan & Timmermann, Allan G & White, Halbert, 1998. "Data-Snooping, Technical Trading Rule Performance and the Bootstrap," CEPR Discussion Papers 1976, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. West, Kenneth D, 1996. "Asymptotic Inference about Predictive Ability," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(5), pages 1067-84, September.
  5. Josef Lakonishok, Seymour Smidt, 1988. "Are Seasonal Anomalies Real? A Ninety-Year Perspective," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 1(4), pages 403-425.
  6. Andrew W. Lo & A. Craig MacKinlay, 1989. "Data-Snooping Biases in Tests of Financial Asset Pricing Models," NBER Working Papers 3001, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Sullivan, Ryan & Timmermann, Allan & White, Halbert, 2001. "Dangers of data mining: The case of calendar effects in stock returns," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 105(1), pages 249-286, November.
  8. Hamilton, James D, 1989. "A New Approach to the Economic Analysis of Nonstationary Time Series and the Business Cycle," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 357-84, March.
  9. Corradi, Valentina & Swanson, Norman R. & Olivetti, Claudia, 2001. "Predictive ability with cointegrated variables," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 315-358, September.
  10. Halbert White, 2000. "A Reality Check for Data Snooping," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(5), pages 1097-1126, September.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Park, Cheol-Ho & Irwin, Scott H., 2005. "The Profitability of Technical Trading Rules in US Futures Markets: A Data Snooping Free Test," AgMAS Project Research Reports 14771, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics.
  2. Gael M. Martin & Andrew Reidy & Jill Wright, 2009. "Does the option market produce superior forecasts of noise-corrected volatility measures?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(1), pages 77-104.
  3. Michael P. Clements & Philip Hans Franses & Norman R. Swanson, 2003. "Forecasting economic and financial time-series with non-linear models," Departmental Working Papers 200309, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  4. Fang, Jiali & Jacobsen, Ben & Qin, Yafeng, 2014. "Predictability of the simple technical trading rules: An out-of-sample test," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 30-45.
  5. repec:dgr:uvatin:2005068 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Lu, Tsung-Hsun, 2014. "The profitability of candlestick charting in the Taiwan stock market," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 65-78.
  7. Sasa Zikovic & Randall Filer, 2012. "Ranking of VaR and ES Models: Performance in Developed and Emerging Markets," CESifo Working Paper Series 3980, CESifo Group Munich.
  8. De Gooijer, Jan G. & Hyndman, Rob J., 2006. "25 years of time series forecasting," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 443-473.
  9. Shynkevich, Andrei, 2012. "Short-term predictability of equity returns along two style dimensions," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 675-685.
  10. Shynkevich, Andrei, 2012. "Performance of technical analysis in growth and small cap segments of the US equity market," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 193-208.
  11. Cheol-Ho Park & Scott H. Irwin, 2007. "What Do We Know About The Profitability Of Technical Analysis?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(4), pages 786-826, 09.
  12. Park, Cheol-Ho & Irwin, Scott H., 2005. "A Reality Check on Technical Trading Rule Profits in US Futures Markets," 2005 Conference, April 18-19, 2005, St. Louis, Missouri 19039, NCR-134 Conference on Applied Commodity Price Analysis, Forecasting, and Market Risk Management.
  13. Shynkevich, Andrei, 2013. "Time-series momentum as an intra- and inter-industry effect: Implications for market efficiency," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 64-85.
  14. Robert Ślepaczuk & Grzegorz Zakrzewski & Paweł Sakowski, 2012. "Investment strategies beating the market. What can we squeeze from the market?," Working Papers 2012-04, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.

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