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Hit Twice? Danish Evidence on the Double-Negative Effect on the Wages of Immigrant Women

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  • Nielsen, Helena S
  • Rosholm, Michael
  • Smith, Nina

Abstract

In this paper, we investigate whether there is a double-negative effect on the wages of immigrant women in Denmark stemming from a negative effect from both gender and foreign country of origin. We estimate separate wage equations for Danes and a number of immigrant groups correcting for sample selection and individual specific effects. Based on a Danish panel of register data, we find that all women are affected by a substantial gender discrimination in wages, but only Pakistani women experience a double-negative effect.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 2502.

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Date of creation: Jul 2000
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:2502

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Related research

Keywords: Double-Negative Effect; Gender Wage Gap; Immigrants; Wage Assimilation;

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References

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  1. Jensen, Peter & Rosholm, Michael & Verner, Mette, 2002. "A Comparison of Different Estimators for Panel Data Sample Selection Models," Working Papers 02-1, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
  2. Husted, Leif & Nielsen, Helena Skyt & Rosholm, Michael & Smith, Nina, 2000. "Employment and Wage Assimilation of Male First Generation Immigrants in Denmark," IZA Discussion Papers 101, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Charles M. Beach & Christopher Worswick, 1993. "Is There a Double-Negative Effect on the Earnings of Immigrant Women?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 19(1), pages 36-53, March.
  4. Mark C. Regets & Harriet Orcutt Duleep, 1999. "Immigrants and Human-Capital Investment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 186-191, May.
  5. Nijman, T.E. & Verbeek, M.J.C.M., 1992. "Non-response in panel data: The impact on estimates of a life cycle consumption function," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-153282, Tilburg University.
  6. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
  7. Grossman, Jean Baldwin, 1984. " The Occupational Attainment of Immigrant Women in Sweden," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 86(3), pages 337-51.
  8. Chiswick, Barry R, 1978. "The Effect of Americanization on the Earnings of Foreign-born Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 897-921, October.
  9. Abul Shamsuddin, 1998. "Thedouble-negativeeffect onthe earnings of foreign-born females in Canada," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(9), pages 1187-1201.
  10. George J. Borjas, 1987. "Self-Selection and the Earnings of Immigrants," NBER Working Papers 2248, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Long, James E, 1980. "The Effect of Americanization on Earnings: Some Evidence for Women," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(3), pages 620-29, June.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Catia Nicodemo & Raul Ramos, 2012. "Wage differentials between native and immigrant women in Spain: Accounting for differences in support," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 118-136, June.
  2. José-Ignacio Antón & Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo & Miguel Carrera, 2010. "From guests to hosts: immigrant-native wage differentials in Spain," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(6), pages 645-659, September.
  3. Antón, José-Ignacio & Muñoz de Bustillo, Rafael & Carrera, Miguel, 2010. "Raining stones? Female immigrants in the Spanish Labor Market," MPRA Paper 20582, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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