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Determinants of International Migration: Empirical Evidence for Migration from Developing Countries to Germany

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  • Rotte, Ralph
  • Vogler, Michael

Abstract

By means of a descriptive survey of theoretical literature we first work out the potential determinants that may drive international migration from developing to developed countries. In addition, we look at the relationship between trade, development and migration. Empirical studies focusing on international migration from Less Developed Countries (LDCs) are, so far, very scarce. In this paper, we utilize a new dataset that is based on migration to Germany from 86 African and Asian countries. Information is available on overall moves (1981–95) and asylum migration (1984–95). The estimation results confirm the importance of the economic differential between countries for migration; the existence of an inverse u-shaped relationship between development and migration; the importance of the political situation in the sending countries; and the significance of network effects.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 1920.

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Date of creation: Jul 1998
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:1920

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Keywords: Developing Countries; International Migration; Migration;

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References

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  1. Ghatak, Subrata & Levine, Paul & Price, Stephen Wheatley, 1996. " Migration Theories and Evidence: An Assessment," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 10(2), pages 159-98, June.
  2. Chris Robinson & Nigel Tomes, 1982. "Self-Selection and Interprovincial Migration in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 15(3), pages 474-502, August.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Bauer, Thomas K. & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2000. "Immigration Policy in Integrated National Economies," IZA Discussion Papers 170, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Donata Bessey, 2007. "International Student Migration to Germany," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0006, University of Zurich, Institute for Strategy and Business Economics (ISU).
  3. Wadim Strielkowski & Jan Hněvkovský, 2013. "The Performance Of The Czech Labour Market After The 2004 Eu Enlargement," Economic Annals, Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade, vol. 58(197), pages 79-94, April –.
  4. Clemente, Jesus & Pueyo, Fernando & Sanz, Fernando, 2008. "A migration model with congestion costs: Does the size of government matter," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 300-311, March.
  5. Hernandez, Diego & Rudolph, Alexandra, 2011. "Modern Day Slavery: What Drives Human Trafficking in Europe?," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 83, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
  6. Dominique Gross & Nicolas Schmitt, 2000. "Do Birds of a Feather Flock Together? Immigration Flows and Cultural Clustering in Host Countries," Working Papers dp00-06, CRABE, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University, revised Feb 2000.
  7. Wadim Strielkowski & Petr Filipec & Miroslav Štefánik & Karolina Kowalska, 2013. "Outward Labour Migration in the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovakia after the EU Enlargement in 2004," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 7(1), pages 042-054, March.
  8. Amaranta Melchor del Río & Susanne Thorwarth, 2006. "Tomatoes or Tomato Pickers? - Free Trade and Migration in the NAFTA Case," Working Papers 0429, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2006.
  9. Victoria Chorny & Rob Euwals & Kees Folmer, 2007. "Immigration policy and welfare state design; a qualitative approach to explore the interaction," CPB Document 153, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  10. Mendoza, Jorge Eduardo, 2006. "Determinantes macroeconómicos regionales de la migración mexicana
    [Regional macroeconomic determinants of Mexican migration]
    ," MPRA Paper 2860, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2006.
  11. Diego Hernandez & Alexandra Rudolph, 2011. "Modern Day Slavery: What Drives Human Trafficking in Europe?," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 97, Courant Research Centre PEG, revised 23 Nov 2011.
  12. Pilar García Gómez & Guillem López, 2003. "Hypothesis on immigration and welfare," Economics Working Papers 905, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Oct 2005.

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