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Exchange Rates in Search of Fundamental Variables

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  • De Grauwe, Paul
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    Abstract

    In this paper it is shown that relatively simple models are capable of generating exchange rate movements that, at least in the short run, are largely disconnected from their fundamental values. The essential ingredient of such models is the hypothesis that economic agents use different information sets. It is assumed that there are two classes of agents, fundamentalists and chartists. The former use the information contained in the model and a forecast of future fundamental variables. The latter forecast the future exchange rate based on past exchange rate movements. The interaction of these two classes of agents creates a non-linearity in the model and is responsible for the complex behaviour of the exchange rate.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 1073.

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    Date of creation: Dec 1994
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    Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:1073

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    Related research

    Keywords: Exchange Markets; Exchange Rates;

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    Cited by:
    1. Kisu Simwaka, 2004. "A look at exchange rate and monetary policy in Malawi," Macroeconomics 0407017, EconWPA.
    2. Paul De Grauwe & Isabel Vansteenkiste, 2001. "Exchange Rates and fundamentals - a Non-Linear Relationship?," CESifo Working Paper Series 577, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Stefan Reitz, 2005. "Central Bank Intervention and Heterogeneous Exchange Rate Expectations: Evidence from the Daily DEM/US-Dollar Exchange Rate," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 33-50, January.
    4. Marie Bessec & François-Mathieu Robineau, 2003. "Comportements chartistes et fondamentalistes. Coexistence ou domination alternative sur le marché des changes?," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 54(6), pages 1213-1238.
    5. Ahrens, Ralf & Reitz, Stefan, 2003. "Heterogeneous Expectations in the Foreign Exchange Market Evidence from the Daily Dollar/DM Exchange Rate," CFS Working Paper Series 2003/11, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    6. Murray, J. & Van Norden, S. & Vigfusson, R., 1996. "Excess Volatility and Speculative Bubbles in the Canadian Dollar: Real of Imagined?," Technical Reports 76, Bank of Canada.

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