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Private information : an argument for a fixed exchange rate system

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  • Aubert, Ludovic
  • Laskar, Daniel

Abstract

In a two-country model, the paper considers reputational equilibria for monetary policies in the case where the central banks have some private information. It is shown that a fixed exchange rate system may lead, in both countries, to lower inflation biases than a flexible exchange rate system. No exogenous costs (like "political costs") of leaving the fixed exchange rate system are required for such a result to hold. The reason is that private information makes a money supply rule more difficult to sustain through reputational forces than an exchange rate rule.

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File URL: http://www.cepremap.fr/depot/couv_orange/co9903.ps
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File URL: http://www.cepremap.fr/depot/couv_orange/co9903.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by CEPREMAP in its series CEPREMAP Working Papers (Couverture Orange) with number 9903.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: 1999
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cpm:cepmap:9903

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  1. Matthew B. Canzoneri & Dale W. Henderson, 1991. "Monetary Policy in Interdependent Economies: A Game-Theoretic Approach," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262031787.
  2. Robert J. Barro & David B. Gordon, 1984. "Rules, Discretion and Reputation in a Model of Monetary Policy," NBER Working Papers 1079, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Giavazzi, Francesco & Pagano, Marco, 1988. "The advantage of tying one's hands : EMS discipline and Central Bank credibility," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 1055-1075, June.
  4. Mélitz, Jacques, 1988. "Monetary Discipline and Cooperation in the European Monetary System: A Synthesis," CEPR Discussion Papers 219, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Canzoneri, Matthew B, 1985. "Monetary Policy Games and the Role of Private Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(5), pages 1056-70, December.
  6. Robert J. Barro & David B. Gordon, 1983. "A Positive Theory of Monetary Policy in a Natural-Rate Model," NBER Working Papers 0807, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. von Hagen, Jurgen, 1992. "Policy-Delegation and Fixed Exchange Rates," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 33(4), pages 849-70, November.
  8. Kydland, Finn E & Prescott, Edward C, 1977. "Rules Rather Than Discretion: The Inconsistency of Optimal Plans," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(3), pages 473-91, June.
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