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Democracy, rule of law, corruption incentives, and growth

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  • de la CROIX, David
  • DELAVALLADE, Clara

Abstract

We bridge the gap between the standard theory of growth and the mostly static theory of corruption. Some public investment can be diverted from its purpose by corrupt individuals. Voters determine the level of public investment subject to an incentive constraint equalizing the returns from productive and corrupt activities. We concentrate on two exogenous institutional parameters : the “technology of corruption” is the ease with which rent-seekers can capture a proportion of public spending. The “concentration of political power” is the extent to which rent-seekers have more political influence than other people. One theoretical prediction is that the effects of the two institutional parameters on income growth and equilibrium corruption are different according to the constraints that are binding at equilibrium. In particular, the effect of judicial quality on growth should be stronger when political power is concentrated. We estimate a system of equations where both corruption and incime growth are determined simultaneously and show that income growth is more affected by our proxies for legal and politiccal institutions in countries where political rights and judicial institutions respectively are limited.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9779.2011.01497.x
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Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) in its series CORE Discussion Papers RP with number -2347.

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Handle: RePEc:cor:louvrp:-2347

Note: In : Journal of Public Economic Theory, 13(2), 155-187, 2011
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  1. Isaac Ehrlich & Francis T. Lui, 1999. "Bureaucratic Corruption and Endogenous Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(S6), pages S270-S293, December.
  2. Theo Eicher & Cecilia García-Peñalosa & Tanguy van Ypersele, 2009. "Education, Corruption and Constitutional Reform," Working Papers UWEC-2007-17-P, University of Washington, Department of Economics.
  3. de la Croix,David & Michel,Philippe, 2002. "A Theory of Economic Growth," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521806428, April.
  4. James H. Stock & Motohiro Yogo, 2002. "Testing for Weak Instruments in Linear IV Regression," NBER Technical Working Papers 0284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. La Porta, Rafael & Lopez-de-Silanes, Florencio & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W., 1998. "Law and Finance," Scholarly Articles 3451310, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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  7. McKenzie, Lionel W., 2005. "Optimal economic growth, turnpike theorems and comparative dynamics," Handbook of Mathematical Economics, in: K. J. Arrow & M.D. Intriligator (ed.), Handbook of Mathematical Economics, edition 2, volume 3, chapter 26, pages 1281-1355 Elsevier.
  8. Carlos Leite & Jens Weidmann, 1999. "Does Mother Nature Corrupt," IMF Working Papers 99/85, International Monetary Fund.
  9. Cuong Le Van & Mathilde Maurel, 2006. "Education, corruption and growth in developing countries," Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques v06080, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1).
  10. Docquier, Frederic & Tarbalouti, Essaid, 2001. " Bribing Votes: A New Explanation to the "Inequality-Redistribution" Puzzle in LDCs," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 108(3-4), pages 259-72, September.
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  12. Mohtadi, Hamid & Roe, Terry L., 2001. "Democracy, Rent Seeking, Public Spending And Growth," Bulletins 12981, University of Minnesota, Economic Development Center.
  13. Bockstette, Valerie & Chanda, Areendam & Putterman, Louis, 2002. " States and Markets: The Advantage of an Early Start," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 347-69, December.
  14. Ngo Long & Gerhard Sorger, 2006. "Insecure property rights and growth: the role of appropriation costs, wealth effects, and heterogeneity," Economic Theory, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 513-529, 08.
  15. Cragg, John G. & Donald, Stephen G., 1993. "Testing Identifiability and Specification in Instrumental Variable Models," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(02), pages 222-240, April.
  16. Stock, James H & Wright, Jonathan H & Yogo, Motohiro, 2002. "A Survey of Weak Instruments and Weak Identification in Generalized Method of Moments," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(4), pages 518-29, October.
  17. Coughlin, Peter & Nitzan, Shmuel, 1981. "Electoral outcomes with probabilistic voting and Nash social welfare maxima," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 113-121, February.
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Cited by:
  1. David, DE LA CROIX & Clara, DELAVALLADE, 2006. "Growth, public investment and corruption with failing institutions," Discussion Papers (ECON - Département des Sciences Economiques) 2006057, Université catholique de Louvain, Département des Sciences Economiques.
  2. Panagiotis Arsenis & Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2011. "Corruption, Fertility, and Human Capital," Discussion Papers in Economics 11/28, Department of Economics, University of Leicester, revised Apr 2011.

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