Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Urbanization and/or rural industrialization in China

Contents:

Author Info

  • SONG, Huasheng
  • THISSE, Jacques-François
  • ZHU, Xiwei

Abstract

We study urbanization and rural industrialization in a setting involving one urban region (U) and one rural region (R). Farmers are heterogeneous in their attitude toward migration, while firms' efficiency is higher in U than in R because agglomeration economies have been built in U. Farmers face three options: (i) working in the agricultural sector, (ii) setting up firms in R, or (iii) moving to U. There exists a unique equilibrium, which displays four different patterns. In the first one, both urbanization and rural industrialization occur simultaneously. In the second and third patterns, either urbanization or rural industrialization arises, whereas the last pattern involves an industrial core and an agricultural periphery. The conditions under which each pattern emerges are determined. The transfer of labor from the agricultural to the industrial sector always increases farmers' welfare, while the welfare impact on incumbent urban workers is ambiguous.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2011.08.003
Our checks indicate that this address may not be valid because: 503 Service Unavailable (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2011.08.003 [303 See Other]--> http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0166046211000974 [301 Moved Permanently]--> http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/articleSelectSinglePerm?Redirect=http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166046211000974?via%3Dihub [301 Moved Permanently]--> http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166046211000974?via=ihub). If this is indeed the case, please notify (Alain GILLIS)
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) in its series CORE Discussion Papers RP with number -2338.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation:
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cor:louvrp:-2338

Note: In : Regional Science and Urban Economics, 42(1-2), 126-134, 2011
Contact details of provider:
Postal: Voie du Roman Pays 34, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)
Phone: 32(10)474321
Fax: +32 10474304
Email:
Web page: http://www.uclouvain.be/core
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Sandra Poncet, 2005. "A Fragmented China: Measure and Determinants of Chinese Domestic Market Disintegration," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(3), pages 409-430, 08.
  2. Chun-Chung Au & J. Vernon Henderson, 2006. "Are Chinese Cities Too Small?," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(3), pages 549-576.
  3. Tabuchi, Takatoshi & Thisse, Jacques-Francois, 2002. "Taste heterogeneity, labor mobility and economic geography," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 155-177, October.
  4. Zai Liang & Zhongdong Ma, 2004. "China's Floating Population: New Evidence from the 2000 Census," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., The Population Council, Inc., vol. 30(3), pages 467-488.
  5. Poncet, Sandra, 2006. "Provincial migration dynamics in China: Borders, costs and economic motivations," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 385-398, May.
  6. Kung, James Kai-sing & Lin, Yi-min, 2007. "The Decline of Township-and-Village Enterprises in China's Economic Transition," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 569-584, April.
  7. Au, Chun-Chung & Henderson, J. Vernon, 2006. "How migration restrictions limit agglomeration and productivity in China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 350-388, August.
  8. Putterman, Louis, 1997. "On the past and future of china's township and village-owned enterprises," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 25(10), pages 1639-1655, October.
  9. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2004. "Trade Costs," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(3), pages 691-751, September.
  10. Terry Sicular & Yue Ximing & Björn Gustafsson & Li Shi, 2007. "The Urban-Rural Income Gap And Inequality In China," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 53(1), pages 93-126, 03.
  11. Whalley, John & Zhang, Shunming, 2007. "A numerical simulation analysis of (Hukou) labour mobility restrictions in China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 392-410, July.
  12. Hu, Dapeng, 2002. "Trade, rural-urban migration, and regional income disparity in developing countries: a spatial general equilibrium model inspired by the case of China," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 311-338, May.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cor:louvrp:-2338. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Alain GILLIS).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.