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Differing types of medical prevention appeal to different individuals

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  • BOUCKAERT, Nicolas

    ()
    (Department of Economics, KULeuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium)

  • SCHOKKAERT, Erik

    ()
    (Department of Economics, KULeuven, Belgium; Université catholique de Louvain, CORE, Belgium)

Abstract

We analyse participation in medical prevention with an expected utility model that is sufficiently rich to capture diverging features of different prevention procedures. We distinguish primary and secondary prevention (with one or two rounds) for both fatal or non-fatal diseases. Moreover, we introduce a flexible relationship between the specific disease for which the prevention procedure is set up and the general background health of the individual. We show how these various possibilities change the comparative statics of the prevention decision and we test the differential predictions with data from SHARE (Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe) about participation in mammography, dental caries screening and flu vaccination.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) in its series CORE Discussion Papers with number 2013038.

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Date of creation: 23 Jul 2013
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Handle: RePEc:cor:louvco:2013038

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Keywords: screening; vaccination; expected utility; behavioral economics;

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  1. Carman, Katherine Grace & Kooreman, Peter, 2011. "Flu Shots, Mammograms, and the Perception of Probabilities," IZA Discussion Papers 5739, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Rosalie Viney & Marion Haas & Rochelle Belkar & Denzil G. Fiebig, 2004. "Why worry about awareness in choice problems? Econometric analysis of screening for cervical cancer," Econometric Society 2004 Australasian Meetings 109, Econometric Society.
  3. Franco Peracchi & Valeria Perotti, 2010. "Subjective survival probabilities and life tables: Evidence from Europe," EIEF Working Papers Series 1016, Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance (EIEF), revised Nov 2011.
  4. Jürgen Maurer, 2008. "Who has a clue to preventing the flu? Unravelling supply and demand effects on the take-up of influenza vaccinations," MEA discussion paper series 08170, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  5. V. Kerry Smith & Donald H. Taylor & Frank A. Sloan, 2001. "Longevity Expectations and Death: Can People Predict Their Own Demise?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(4), pages 1126-1134, September.
  6. Johanna Etner & Meglena Jeleva, 2013. "Risk Perception, Prevention And Diagnostic Tests," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(2), pages 144-156, 02.
  7. Sirven, Nicolas & Or, Zeynep & Jusot, Florence, 2012. "Variations in preventive care utilisation in Europe," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/7402, Paris Dauphine University.
  8. Cutler, David M. & Lleras-Muney, Adriana, 2010. "Understanding differences in health behaviors by education," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 1-28, January.
  9. Whynes, David K. & Philips, Zoe & Avis, Mark, 2007. "Why do women participate in the English cervical cancer screening programme?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 306-325, March.
  10. Wu, Stephen, 2003. "Sickness and preventive medical behavior," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 675-689, July.
  11. Julia Witt, 2008. "The effect of information in the utilization of preventive health-care strategies: An application to breast cancer," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(6), pages 721-731.
  12. Howard, David H., 2005. "Life expectancy and the value of early detection," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 891-906, September.
  13. Byrne, Margaret M. & Thompson, Peter, 2001. "Screening and preventable illness," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 1077-1088, November.
  14. Hendrik Schmitz & Ansgar Wübker, 2011. "What determines influenza vaccination take‐up of elderly Europeans?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(11), pages 1281-1297, November.
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