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The Impact of Conditional Cash Transfers on Children´s School Achievement: Evidence from Colombia

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  • Sandra García

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  • Jennifer Hill
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    Abstract

    During the last decade, conditional cash transfer programs have expanded in developingcountries as a way to increase school enrollment and deter youth from dropping out of school. However, despite evidence of these programs´ positive impact on school enrollment and attendance, little is known about their impact on school achievement. Thus, using data from the Colombian conditional cash transfer program Familias en Acción, this study estimated the effect of the conditional subsidy on school achievement. It found that the program does have a positive effect on school achievement for children aged 7 to 12 living in rural areas but practically no effect for the same population living in urban areas. Moreover, the program may actually have a negative effect on the school achievement of adolescents, particularly those living in rural areas. Possible mechanisms of these effects are explored and discussed.

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    File URL: http://economia.uniandes.edu.co/publicaciones/dcede2009-08.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE in its series DOCUMENTOS CEDE with number 005403.

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    Length: 48
    Date of creation: 26 Feb 2009
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:col:000089:005403

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    Keywords: policy analysis; student achievement; subsidies; conditional cash transfers;

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    1. Glewwe, Paul & Jacoby, Hanan G. & King, Elizabeth M., 2001. "Early childhood nutrition and academic achievement: a longitudinal analysis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 345-368, September.
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    11. Ahmed, Akhter U. & Arends-Kuenning, Mary, 2006. "Do crowded classrooms crowd out learning? Evidence from the food for education program in Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 665-684, April.
    12. Anne Case & Angus Deaton, 1999. "School Inputs And Educational Outcomes In South Africa," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(3), pages 1047-1084, August.
    13. Yannis Jemiai & Andrea Rotnitzky & Bryan E. Shepherd & Peter B. Gilbert, 2007. "Semiparametric estimation of treatment effects given base-line covariates on an outcome measured after a post-randomization event occurs," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 69(5), pages 879-901.
    14. Joshua Winicki & Kyle Jemison, 2003. "Food Insecurity and Hunger in the Kindergarten Classroom: Its Effect on Learning and Growth," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(2), pages 145-157, 04.
    15. Skoufias, Emmanuel & Parker, Susan W., 2001. "Conditional cash transfers and their impact on child work and schooling," FCND briefs 123, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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