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Stress Testing Credit Risk: Is the Czech Republic Different from Germany?

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  • Petr Jakubik
  • Christian Schmieder

Abstract

This study deals with credit risk modelling and stress testing within the context of a Merton-type one-factor model. We analyse the corporate and household sectors of the Czech Republic and Germany to find determining variables of credit risk in both countries. We find that a set of similar variables explains corporate credit risk in both countries despite substantial differences in the default rate pattern. This does not apply to households, where further research seems to be necessary. Next, we establish a framework for the stress testing of credit risk. We use a country specific stress scenario that shocks macroeconomic variables with medium severity. The test results in credit risk increasing by more than 100% in the Czech Republic and by roughly 40% in Germany. The two outcomes are not fully comparable since the shocks are calibrated according to the historical development of the time series considered and the size of the shocks for the Czech Republic was driven by the transformation period.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Czech National Bank, Research Department in its series Working Papers with number 2008/9.

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Date of creation: Dec 2008
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Handle: RePEc:cnb:wpaper:2008/9

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Keywords: Credit risk; credit risk modelling; stress testing.;

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References

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  1. Eva Catarineu-Rabell & Patricia Jackson & Dimitrios P Tsomocos, 2003. "Procyclicality and the new Basel Accord - banks' choice of loan rating system," Bank of England working papers 181, Bank of England.
  2. Michael Boss & Gerald Krenn & Claus Puhr & Martin Summer, 2006. "Systemic Risk Monitor: A Model for Systemic Risk Analysis and Stress Testing of Banking Systems," Financial Stability Report, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 11.
  3. Martin Cihak, 2004. "Designing Stress Tests for the Czech Banking System," Research and Policy Notes 2004/03, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
  4. Ivanna Vladkova Hollar & Giovanni Dell'Ariccia & Carlo Cottarelli, 2003. "Early Birds, Late Risers, and Sleeping Beauties," IMF Working Papers 03/213, International Monetary Fund.
  5. Anil Bangia & Francis X. Diebold & Til Schuermann, 2000. "Ratings Migration and the Business Cycle, With Application to Credit Portfolio Stress Testing," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 00-26, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
  6. Philip Bunn & Victoria Redwood, 2003. "Company accounts based modelling of business failures and the implications for financial stability," Bank of England working papers 210, Bank of England.
  7. John G. Cragg & Russell S. Uhler, 1970. "The Demand for Automobiles," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 3(3), pages 386-406, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Alena Bicakova & Zuzana Prelcova & Renata Pasalicova, 2011. "Who Borrows and Who May Not Repay?," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp443, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague.
  2. Adam Gersl & Jakub Seidler, 2010. "Conservative Stress Testing: The Role of Regular Verification," Working Papers IES 2010/12, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Jul 2008.
  3. Adam Gersl & Petr Jakubik & Tomas Konecny & Jakub Seidler, 2012. "Dynamic Stress Testing: The Framework for Testing Banking Sector Resilience Used by the Czech National Bank," Working Papers 2012/11, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
  4. Adam Gersl & Petr Jakubik & Dorota Kowalczyk & Steven Ongena & Jose-Luis Peydro Alcalde, 2012. "Monetary Conditions and Banks' Behaviour in the Czech Republic," Working Papers 2012/02, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
  5. Bogdan-Gabriel MOINESCU, 2012. "Determinants Of Nonperforming Loans In Central And Eastern European Countries: Macroeconomic Indicators And Credit Discipline," Review of Economic and Business Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, issue 10, pages 47-58, December.
  6. Adam Gersl & Jakub Seidler, 2012. "How to Improve the Quality of Stress Tests through Backtesting," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 62(4), pages 325-346, August.
  7. Petr Jakubík & Petr Teplý, 2011. "The JT Index as an Indicator of Financial Stability of Corporate Sector," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2011(2), pages 157-176.
  8. Adam Gersl & Petr Jakubik, 2010. "Procyclicality of the Financial System and Simulation of the Feedback Effect," Occasional Publications - Chapters in Edited Volumes, in: CNB Financial Stability Report 2009/2010, chapter 0, pages 110-119 Czech National Bank, Research Department.
  9. Adam Gersl & Jakub Seidler, 2010. "Stress Test Verification as Part of an Advanced Stress-Testing Framework," Occasional Publications - Chapters in Edited Volumes, in: CNB Financial Stability Report 2009/2010, chapter 0, pages 92-101 Czech National Bank, Research Department.
  10. Adam Gersl & Petr Jakubik & Tomas Konecny & Jakub Seidler, 2013. "Dynamic Stress Testing: The Framework for Assessing the Resilience of the Banking Sector Used by the Czech National Bank," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 63(6), pages 505-536, December.
  11. Natalia Podlich & Didar Illyasov & Elena Tsoy & Shynar Shaikh, 2010. "The Methodology of Stress Tests for the Kazakh Banking System," Ifo Working Paper Series Ifo Working Paper Nr. 85, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.

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