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Propensity Score Matching Methods for Non-Experimental Causal Studies

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Author Info

  • Dehejia, R.H.
  • Wahba, S.

Abstract

This paper considers causal inference and sample selection bias in non-experimental settings in which: (i) few units in the non-experimental comparison group are comparable to the treatment units; (ii) selecting a subset of comparison units similar to the treatment units is difficult because units must be compared across a high-dimentional set of pretreatment characteristics. We propose the use of propensity score matching methods, and implement them using data from the NSW experiment.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Columbia University, Department of Economics in its series Discussion Papers with number 1998_02.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 1998
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:clu:wpaper:1998_02

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Keywords: MATCHING ; EVALUATION ; ECONOMIC MODELS;

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References

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  1. Czajka, John L, et al, 1992. "Projecting from Advance Data Using Propensity Modeling: An Application to Income and Tax Statistics," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 10(2), pages 117-31, April.
  2. Heckman, James J & Ichimura, Hidehiko & Todd, Petra E, 1997. "Matching as an Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(4), pages 605-54, October.
  3. Ashenfelter, Orley C, 1978. "Estimating the Effect of Training Programs on Earnings," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(1), pages 47-57, February.
  4. Ashenfelter, Orley & Card, David, 1985. "Using the Longitudinal Structure of Earnings to Estimate the Effect of Training Programs," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(4), pages 648-60, November.
  5. Daniel Friedlander & David H. Greenberg & Philip K. Robins, 1997. "Evaluating Government Training Programs for the Economically Disadvantaged," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(4), pages 1809-1855, December.
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As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. HowTo: Propensity Score Matching
    by zooeygoethe in Economic Objectorvism on 2007-06-12 23:43:04
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