Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Is Shared Housing a Way to Reduce Homelessness? The Effect of Household Arrangements on Formerly Homeless People

Contents:

Author Info

  • Yinghua He

    ()
    (Columbia University - Department of Economics)

  • Brendan O'Flaherty

    ()
    (Columbia University - Department of Economics)

  • Robert A.Rosenheck

    (Scientific consultants)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Most single adults share housing with other adults, and living alone is considerably more expensive than living with someone else. Yet policies that discourage shared housing for formerly homeless people or people at risk of becoming homeless are common, and those that discourage it are rare. This would be understandable if such housing adversely affected its users in some way. We ask whether shared housing produces adverse effects. Our provisional answer is no. Indeed, shared housing is associated with reduced psychotic symptomology and it appears that this relationship is causal over some time frames, although the latter result is not robust. We use data from ACCESS, a 5-year, 18-site demonstration project with over 6,000 formerly homeless individuals as participants.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.econ.columbia.edu/RePEc/pdf/DP0809-04.pdf
    Our checks indicate that this address may not be valid because: 404 Not Found (http://www.econ.columbia.edu/RePEc/pdf/DP0809-04.pdf [301 Moved Permanently]--> http://econ.columbia.edu/RePEc/pdf/DP0809-04.pdf). If this is indeed the case, please notify (Discussion Paper Coordinator)
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Columbia University, Department of Economics in its series Discussion Papers with number 0809-04.

    as in new window
    Length:
    Date of creation: 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:clu:wpaper:0809-04

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: 1022 International Affairs Building, 420 West 118th Street, New York, NY 10027
    Phone: (212) 854-3680
    Fax: (212) 854-8059
    Web page: http://www.econ.columbia.edu/
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords:

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:clu:wpaper:0809-04. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Discussion Paper Coordinator).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.