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Why Did The Incumbency Advantage In U.S. House Elections Grow?

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  • Cox, Gary W.
  • Katz, Jonathan N.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences in its series Working Papers with number 939.

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Date of creation: Sep 1995
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Publication status: Published: Published in American Journal of Political Science, 1996, V. 40, #2, pg. 478-497
Handle: RePEc:clt:sswopa:939

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Postal: Working Paper Assistant, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences, 228-77, Caltech, Pasadena CA 91125
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Web page: http://www.hss.caltech.edu/ss

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Postal: Working Paper Assistant, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences, 228-77, Caltech, Pasadena CA 91125
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Cited by:
  1. Paul Redmond & John Regan, 2013. "Incumbency Advantage in Irish Elections: A Regression Discontinuity Analysis," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n241-13.pdf, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
  2. Roland Hodler & Simon Loertscher & Dominic Rohner, 2007. "Inefficient Policies and Incumbency Advantage," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 996, The University of Melbourne.
  3. Matthew T. Cole & Ivan Pastine & Tuvana Pastine, 2013. "Incumbency Advantage in an Electoral Contest," Working Papers 1304, Florida International University, Department of Economics.
  4. Markus Müller, 2009. "Vote-Share Contracts and Learning-by-Doing," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 09/114, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
  5. Uppal, Yogesh, 2007. "The Disadvantaged Incumbents: Estimating Incumbency Effects in Indian State Legislatures," MPRA Paper 8515, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Florian Ade & Ronny Freier & Christian Odendahl, 2011. "Incumbency, Party Identity and Governmental Lead: Evidence for Heterogeneous Incumbency Effects for Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1177, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  7. Sung-Kyu Lee, 2013. "The Effects of Election Advertising Spending and Incumbency on the General Election Results in Great Britain," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 3, pages 97-118, May.
  8. Leandro De Magalhães, 2012. "Incumbency Effects in Brazilian Mayoral Elections:A Regression Discontinuity Design Abstract: I use a regression discontinuity design to study incumbency effects in Brazilian mayoral elections. For ma," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 12/284, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  9. Volker Hahn, 2012. "Designing Monetary Policy Committees," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2012-23, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
  10. Michael Ensley & Scott Marchi & Michael Munger, 2007. "Candidate uncertainty, mental models, and complexity: Some experimental results," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 132(1), pages 231-246, July.
  11. Daron Acemoglu & Georgy Egorov & Konstantin Sonin, 2009. "Political Selection and Persistence of Bad Governments," NBER Working Papers 15230, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Gersbach, Hans, 2009. "Higher Vote Thresholds for Incumbents, Effort and Selection," CEPR Discussion Papers 7320, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. Bach, Laurent, 2012. "Faut-il abolir le cumul des mandats?," Opuscules du CEPREMAP, CEPREMAP, number 27, May.
  14. Gautam Gowrisankaran & Matthew F. Mitchell & Andrea Moro, 2008. "Electoral Design and Voter Welfare from the U.S. Senate: Evidence from a Dynamic Selection Model," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(1), pages 1-17, January.

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