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The Relative Earnings of Young Mexican, Black, and White Women

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  • Heather Antecol

    (Claremont McKenna College)

  • Kelly Bedard

    (UC - Santa Barbara)

Abstract

Using the NLSY, we find that young Mexican women earn 9% less than young White women while young Black women earn 15% less than young White women. Although young Mexican women earn less than young White women, they do surprisingly well compared to young Black women. We show that it is crucially important to account for actual labor market experience. We further show that low labor force attachment is the most important determinant of the Black- White wage differential for young women while education is the most important explanation for the Mexican-White wage gap for young women.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Claremont Colleges in its series Claremont Colleges Working Papers with number 1999-02.

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Handle: RePEc:clm:clmeco:1999-02

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Keywords: discrimination; women;

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References

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  1. Trejo, Stephen J, 1997. "Why Do Mexican Americans Earn Low Wages?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(6), pages 1235-68, December.
  2. Phipps, S.A. & Burton, P. & Lethbridge, L., 1998. "In and Out of the Labour Market: Long-Term Income Consequences of Interruptions in Paid Work," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive 98-03, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
  3. Sanders Korenman & David Neumark, 1990. "Marriage, Motherhood, and Wages," NBER Working Papers 3473, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Stephen J. Trejo, 2003. "Intergenerational Progress of Mexican-Origin Workers in the U.S. Labor Market," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(3).
  5. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
  6. Moffitt, Robert, 1992. "Incentive Effects of the U.S. Welfare System: A Review," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(1), pages 1-61, March.
  7. Phipps, S.A. & Burton, P. & Lethbridge, L., 1998. "In and Out of the Labour Market: Long-Term Income Consequences of Interruptions in Paid Work," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive 98-03, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
  8. Mora, Marie T & Davila, Alberto, 1998. "Gender, Earnings, and the English Skill Acquisition of Hispanic Workers in the United States," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(4), pages 631-44, October.
  9. Moon-Kak Kim & Solomon W. Polachek, 1994. "Panel Estimates of Male-Female Earnings Functions," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(2), pages 406-428.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Peter McHenry & Melissa McInerney, 2012. "Are Wage Premiums for Black Women Illusory? A Critical Examination," Working Papers 120, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
  2. Tracy Regan & Ronald Oaxaca, 2009. "Work experience as a source of specification error in earnings models: implications for gender wage decompositions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 463-499, April.
  3. Antecol, Heather & Bedard, Kelly, 2002. "The Racial Wage Gap: The Importance of Labor Force Attachment Differences," University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series qt7cb6q4m9, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.
  4. Luis Locay & Tracy Regan & Arthur M. Diamond Jr., 2008. "The Effects of Spanish-Language Background on Completed Schooling and Aptitude Test Scores," Working Papers 0909, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  5. Heather Antecol & Kelly Bedard, 2004. "The Racial Wage Gap: The Importance of Labor Force Attachment Differences across Black, Mexican, and White Men," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(2).
  6. Heather Antecol & Kelly Bedard, 2007. "Does single parenthood increase the probability of teenage promiscuity, substance use, and crime?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 55-71, February.

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