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Further evidence on the link between health care spending and health outcomes in England

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Author Info

  • Stephen Martin

    (Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York)

  • Nigel Rice

    (Centre for Health Economics, University of York)

  • Peter C Smith

    (Centre for Health Economics, University of York)

Abstract

This report describes results from research funded by the Health Foundation under its Quest for Quality and Improved Performance (QQuIP) initiative. It builds on our earlier report for the Health Foundation – The link between health care spending and health outcomes: evidence from English programme budgeting data – that took advantage of the availability of a major new dataset to examine the relationship between health care expenditure and mortality rates for two disease categories (cancer and circulation problems) across 300 English Primary Care Trusts. Our results are useful from a number of perspectives. Scientifically, they confirm our previous findings that health care has an important impact on health across a range of conditions, suggesting that those results were robust across programmes of care and across years. From a policy perspective, these results can help set priorities by informing resource allocation across a larger number of programmes of care. They also add further evidence to help NICE decide whether its current QALY threshold is at the right level.

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File URL: http://www.york.ac.uk/media/che/documents/papers/researchpapers/rp32_link_between_health_care_spending_and_health_outcomes.pdf
File Function: First version, 2007
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Health Economics, University of York in its series Working Papers with number 032cherp.

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Length: 58 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:chy:respap:32cherp

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References

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  1. Pierre-Yves Crémieux & Pierre Ouellette & Caroline Pilon, 1999. "Health care spending as determinants of health outcomes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(7), pages 627-639.
  2. Pesaran, M. H. & Taylor, L.W., 1997. "Diagnostics for IV Regressions," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9709, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  3. John Nixon & Philippe Ulmann, 2006. "The relationship between health care expenditure and health outcomes," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 7-18, March.
  4. Gravelle, H.S.E. & Backhouse, M.E., 1987. "International cross-section analysis of the determination of mortality," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 427-441, January.
  5. Cragg, John G. & Donald, Stephen G., 1993. "Testing Identifiability and Specification in Instrumental Variable Models," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(02), pages 222-240, April.
  6. Zeynep Or, 2001. "Exploring the Effects of Health Care on Mortality Across OECD Countries," OECD Labour Market and Social Policy Occasional Papers 46, OECD Publishing.
  7. Stephen Martin & Nigel Rice & Peter C Smith, 2007. "The Link Between Health Care Spending and Health Outcomes: Evidence from English Programme Budgeting Data," Working Papers 024cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
  8. James H. Stock & Motohiro Yogo, 2002. "Testing for Weak Instruments in Linear IV Regression," NBER Technical Working Papers 0284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. repec:cup:etheor:v:9:y:1993:i:2:p:222-40 is not listed on IDEAS
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Stephen Martin & Nigel Rice & Peter C Smith, 2008. "The link between health care spending and health outcomes for the new English Primary Care Trusts," Working Papers 042cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
  2. Julien Forder, 2009. "Long-term care and hospital utilisation by older people: an analysis of substitution rates," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(11), pages 1322-1338.

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