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Malnutrition in South-Asia. Poverty, diet or lack of female empowerment?

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Author Info

  • Magnus Hatlebakk

Abstract

Despite economic growth, and a reduction in poverty, malnutrition is still rampant in South-Asia. This indicates that non-economic factors are important, and we use a nation-wide survey from Nepal to identify factors that may explain why small children are stunted. In contrast to designated studies of child nutrition we do not have information on individual food intake, but we demonstrate that analysis of large sample surveys is a good supplement to designated studies, with the main benefit being that findings are nationally representative. We find that pulses are critical for child growth, and that boys are more often malnourished, maybe because they are expected to take other food than breast milk. Furthermore we find that girls are more likely malnourished if they have many older brothers, and we find that female empowerment improves child nutrition.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway in its series CMI Working Papers with number 4.

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Length: 18 pages
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:chm:wpaper:wp2012-4

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Related research

Keywords: Female autonomy; Stunting; Intra-household allocation;

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  1. Gittelsohn, Joel, 1991. "Opening the box: Intrahousehold food allocation in rural Nepal," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1141-1154, January.
  2. Raghav Gaiha & Veena Kulkarni, 2005. "Anthropometric failure and persistence of poverty in rural India," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(2), pages 179-197.
  3. D. E. Sahn & D. C. Stifel, 2002. "Parental Preferences for Nutrition of Boys and Girls: Evidence from Africa," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(1), pages 21-45.
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