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The Economic and Demographic Transition, Mortality, and Comparative Development

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  • Cervellati, Matteo

    (University of Bologna)

  • Sunde, Uwe

    (University of Munich)

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    Abstract

    We propose a unified growth theory to investigate the mechanics generating the economic and demographic transition, and the role of mortality differences for comparative development. The framework can replicate the quantitative pat- terns in historical time series data and in contemporaneous cross-country panel data, including the bi-modal distribution of the endogenous variables across coun- tries. The results suggest that differences in extrinsic mortality might explain a substantial part of the observed differences in the timing of the take-off across countries and the worldwide density distribution of the main variables of interest.

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    File URL: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/economics/research/centres/cage/research/wpfeed/113._2013_cervellati.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE) in its series CAGE Online Working Paper Series with number 113.

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    Date of creation: 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:cge:wacage:113

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    Web page: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/economics/research/centres/cage/
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    Related research

    Keywords: Economic and Demographic Transition; Adult Mortality; Child Mortality; Quantitative Analysis; Unified Growth Model; Heterogeneous Human Capital; Comparative Development; Development Traps;

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    1. Andrés Erosa & Tatyana Koreshkova & Diego Restuccia, 2009. "How important is human capital? A quantitative theory assessment of world income inequality," Working Papers 2009-11, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA) Ciencias Sociales.
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    Cited by:
    1. Hansen, Casper Worm, 2013. "Life expectancy and human capital: Evidence from the international epidemiological transition," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1142-1152.
    2. Casper Worm Hansen & Peter Sandholt Jensen & Lars Lønstrup, 2014. "The Fertility Transition in the US: Schooling or Income?," Economics Working Papers 2014-02, School of Economics and Management, University of Aarhus.
    3. Lagerlöf, Nils-Petter, 2014. "Population, technology and fragmentation: The European miracle revisited," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 87-105.

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