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A Millennium Learning Goal: Measuring Real Progress in Education

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  • Deon Filmer

    ()

  • Amer Hasan
  • Lant Pritchett

Abstract

The Millennium Development Goal for primary schooling completion has focused attention on a measurable output indicator to monitor increases in schooling in poor countries. We argue the next step, which moves towards the even more important Millennium Learning Goal, is to monitor outcomes of learning achievement. We demonstrate that even in countries meeting the MDG of primary completion, the majority of youth are not reaching even minimal competency levels, let alone the competencies demanded in a globalized environment. Even though Brazil is on track to the meet the MDG, our estimates are that 78 percent of Brazilian youth lack even minimally adequate competencies in mathematics and 96 percent do not reach what we posit as a reasonable global standard of adequacy. Mexico has reached the MDG—but 50 percent of youth are not minimally competent in math and 91 percent do not reach a global standard. While nearly all countries’ education systems are expanding quantitatively nearly all are failing in their fundamental purpose. Policymakers, educators and citizens need to focus on the real target of schooling: adequately equipping their nation’s youth for full participation as adults in economic, political and social roles. A goal of school completion alone is an increasingly inadequate guide for action. With a Millennium Learning Goal, progress of the education system will be judged on the outcomes of the system: the assessed mastery of the desired competencies of an entire age cohort—both those in school and out of school. By focusing on the learning achievement of all children in a cohort an MLG eliminates the false dichotomy between “access/enrollment” and “quality of those in school”: reaching an MLG depends on both.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Center for Global Development in its series Working Papers with number 97.

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Length: 45 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cgd:wpaper:97

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Web page: http://www.cgdev.org

Related research

Keywords: primary school; poverty; millenium development goals; school completion; school enrollment;

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Cited by:
  1. Gertler, Paul & Patrinos, Harry & Rubio-Codina, Marta, 2008. "Empowering parents to improve education : evidence from rural Mexico," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3935, The World Bank.
  2. Das, Jishnu & Zajonc, Tristan, 2008. "India shining and Bharat drowning: comparing two Indian states to the worldwide distribution in mathematics achievement," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4644, The World Bank.

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