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Diasporas

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  • Michel Beine
  • Frédéric Docquier
  • Caglar Özden

Abstract

Migration flows are shaped by a complex combination of self-selection and out-selection mechanisms. In this paper, we analyze how existing diasporas (the stock of people born in a country and living in an another one) affect the size and human-capital structure of current migration flows. Our analysis exploits a bilateral data set on international migration by educational attainment from 195 countries to 30 OECD countries in 1990 and 2000. Based on simple micro-foundations and controlling for various determinants of migration, we find diasporas increase migration flows, lower their average educational level and lead to higher concentration of low-skill migrants. Interestingly, diasporas explain majority of the variability of migration flows and selection. This suggests that, without changing the generosity of family reunion programs, education-based selection rules are likely to have moderate impact. Our results are highly robust to the econometric techniques, accounting for the large proportion of zeros and endogeneity problems.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 2607.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_2607

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Keywords: migration; self-selection; network/diaspora externalities;

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References

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  1. Simone BERTOLI, 2010. "Networks, Sorting and Self-selection of Ecuadorian Migrants," Annales d'Economie et de Statistique, ENSAE, issue 97-98, pages 261-288.
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  1. World Bank Working Paper: Diasporas
    by Liam Delaney in Geary Behaviour Centre on 2009-11-15 23:40:00

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  1. > International Economics > International Migration
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