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Access All Areas? The Impact of Fees and Background on Student Demand for Postgraduate Higher Education in the UK

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  • Philip Wales
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    Abstract

    This paper analyses participation in postgraduate higher education in the UK at the micro-level makes several contributions to the literature. Firstly, it describes trends in postgraduate participation in the UK. Secondly, it introduces a hitherto unavailable dataset of postgraduate tuition fees by institution and subject: the first of its kind. Thirdly, it attempts to control for several potential forms of endogeneity to assess the extent to which tuition fees affect demand. It adopts an instrumental variables approach to partially control for the potential endogeneity of tuition fees and includes a broad array of fixed effects to mitigate the impact of sorting into universities and endogenous residential selection. The results suggest that (1) there is substantial variation in tuition fees across and within institutions and that (2) tuition fees reduce demand for postgraduate places. In our preferred specification a 10% increase in tuition fees reduces the probability of progression by 1.7%.

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    File URL: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0128.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE in its series SERC Discussion Papers with number 0128.

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    Date of creation: Feb 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:cep:sercdp:0128

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    Web page: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/SERC/publications/default.asp

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    Keywords: Education; human capital; skills; consumer economics: empirical analysis;

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