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Heterogeneity, Demand for Insurance and Adverse Selection

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  • Johannes Spinnewijn
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    Abstract

    Recent empirical work finds that surprisingly little variation in the demand for insurance is explained by heterogeneity in risks. I distinguish between heterogeneity in risk preferences and risk perceptions underlying the unexplained variation. Heterogeneous risk perceptions induce a systematic difference between the revealed and actual value of insurance as a function of the insurance price. Using a sufficient statistics approach that accounts for this alternative source of heterogeneity, I find that the welfare conclusions regarding adversely selected markets are substantially different. The source of heterogeneity is also essential for the evaluation of different interventions intended to correct inefficiencies due to adverse selection like insurance subsidies and mandates, risk-adjusted pricing and information policies.

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    File URL: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/dp1142.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp1142.

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    Date of creation: May 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp1142

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    Web page: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP

    Related research

    Keywords: Heterogeneity; adverse selection; risk perceptions; welfare and policy;

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    1. Liran Einav & Amy Finkelstein & Jonathan Levin, 2010. "Beyond Testing: Empirical Models of Insurance Markets," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 2(1), pages 311-336, 09.
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    Cited by:
    1. Benjamin R. Handel & Jonathan T. Kolstad, 2013. "Health Insurance for “Humans”: Information Frictions, Plan Choice, and Consumer Welfare," NBER Working Papers 19373, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Cremer, Helmuth & Roeder, Kerstin, 2011. "Long-term care policy, myopia and redistribution," TSE Working Papers 12-314, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE), revised May 2012.

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