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Students academic self-perception

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  • Arnaud Chevalier
  • Steve Gibbons
  • Sherria Hoskins
  • Martin Snell
  • Andy Thorpe

Abstract

Participation rates in higher education differ persistently between some groups in society. Using two British datasets we investigate whether this gap is rooted in students' mis-perception of their own and other's ability, thereby increasing the expected costs to studying. Among high school pupils, we find that pupils with a more positive view of their academic abilities are more likely to expect to continue to higher education even after controlling for observable measures of ability and students' characteristics. University students are also poor at estimating their own test-performance and over-estimate their predicted test score. However, females, white and working class students have less inflated view of themselves. Self-perception has limited impact on the expected probability of success and expected returns amongst these university students.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE in its series CEE Discussion Papers with number 0090.

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Date of creation: Jan 2008
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Handle: RePEc:cep:ceedps:0090

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Web page: http://cee.lse.ac.uk/publications.htm

Related research

Keywords: Test performance; self-assessment; higher education participation; academic self-perception;

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References

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  1. Christopher Cornwell & David B. Mustard & Deepa J. Sridhar, 2006. "The Enrollment Effects of Merit-Based Financial Aid: Evidence from Georgia's HOPE Program," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(4), pages 761-786, October.
  2. David A. Penn & Reuben Kyle, 2007. "The Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship: A Reward for Past Achievement or Motivator for Future Performance?," Working Papers 200707, Middle Tennessee State University, Department of Economics and Finance.
  3. Dan Lovallo & Colin Camerer, 1999. "Overconfidence and Excess Entry: An Experimental Approach," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(1), pages 306-318, March.
  4. Carneiro, Pedro & Heckman, James J., 2003. "Human Capital Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 821, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Nick Feltovich & Richmond Harbaugh & Ted To, 2002. "Too Cool for School? Signalling and Countersignalling," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 33(4), pages 630-649, Winter.
  6. Susan M. Dynarski, 1999. "Does Aid Matter? Measuring the Effect of Student Aid on College Attendance and Completion," NBER Working Papers 7422, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Giorgio Brunello & Claudio Lucifora & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2004. "The Wage Expectations of European Business and Economics Students," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(4).
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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Class and confidence
    by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2011-11-24 14:44:42
  2. The Causes of Wealth Inequality (24): Self-Confidence
    by Filip Spagnoli in P.A.P.-Blog on 2012-04-01 13:01:10
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Cited by:
  1. Jason M. Lindo & Nicholas J. Sanders & Philip Oreopoulos, 2008. "Ability, Gender, and Performance Standards: Evidence from Academic Probation," NBER Working Papers 14261, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Antonio Filippin & Marco Paccagnella, 2012. "Family background, self-confidence and economic outcomes," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 875, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  3. Johansson Stenman, Olof & Nordblom, Katarina, 2010. "Are Men Really More Overconfident than Women? - A Natural Field Experiment on Exam Behavior," Working Papers in Economics 461, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  4. Hendrik van Broekhuizen & Dieter von Fintel, 2010. "Who Responds to Voluntary Cognitive Tests in Household Surveys? The Role of Labour Market Status, Respondent Confidence, Motivation and a Culture of Learning in South Africa," Working Papers 27/2010, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
  5. Kim, Youngmi & Sherraden, Michael & Clancy, Margaret, 2013. "Do mothers’ educational expectations differ by race and ethnicity, or socioeconomic status?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 82-94.

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