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Technology Use and Worker Outcomes: Direct Evidence from Linked Employee-Employer Data

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Author Info

  • Adela Luque
  • Javier Miranda

Abstract

We investigate the impact of technology adoption on workers’ wages and mobility in U.S. manufacturing plants by constructing and exploiting a unique Linked Employee-Employer data set containing longitudinal worker and plant information. We first examine the effect of technology use on wage determination, and find that technology adoption does not have a significant effect on high-skill workers, but negatively affects the earnings of low-skill workers after controlling for worker-plant fixed effects. This result seems to support the skill-biased technological change hypothesis. We next explore the impact of technology use on worker mobility, and find that mobility rates are higher in high-technology plants, and that high-skill workers are more mobile than their low and medium-skill counterparts. However, our technology-skill interaction term indicates that as the number of adopted technologies increases, the probability of exit of skilled workers decreases while that of unskilled workers increases.

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File URL: ftp://ftp2.census.gov/ces/wp/2000/CES-WP-00-13.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau in its series Working Papers with number 00-13.

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Date of creation: Aug 2000
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Handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:00-13

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Keywords: CES; economic; research; micro; data; microdata; chief; economist;

References

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  1. John M. Abowd & Francis Kramarz & David N. Margolis, 1994. "High-Wage Workers and High-Wage Firms," CIRANO Working Papers 94s-23, CIRANO.
  2. Lisa M Lynch & Sandra E Black, 2002. "How to Compete: The Impact of Workplace Practices and Information Technology on Productivity," Working Papers 02-04, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  3. John Haltiwanger & Steven J Davis & Scott Schuh, 1991. "Published Versus Sample Statistics From The ASM: Implications For The LRD," Working Papers 91-1, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  4. Dunne, T. & Roberts, M.J., 1990. "Wages And The Risk Of Plant Closing," Papers 6-90-2, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
  5. David H. Autor & Lawrence F. Katz & Alan B. Krueger, 1998. "Computing Inequality: Have Computers Changed The Labor Market?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 113(4), pages 1169-1213, November.
  6. Timothy Bates, 1989. "Entrepreneur Factor Inputs and Small Business Longevity," Working Papers 89-4, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  7. Dominique Goux & Eric Maurin, 1998. "The Decline in Demand for Unskilled Labor : An Empirical Analysis Method and its Application to France," Working Papers 98-53, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.
  8. Steven J. Davis & John Haltiwanger, 1990. "Gross Job Creation and Destruction: Microeconomic Evidence and Macroeconomic Implications," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1990, Volume 5, pages 123-186 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. H, Entorf & Michel Gollac & Francis Kramarz, 1997. "New Technologies, Wages and Worker Selection," Working Papers 97-25, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.
  10. Frank R. Lichtenberg & Donald Siegel, 1991. "The Impact of R&D Investment On Productivity - New Evidence Using Linked R&D-LRD Data," NBER Working Papers 2901, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Dunne, Timothy & Schmitz, James A, Jr, 1995. "Wages, Employment Structure and Employer Size-Wage Premia: Their Relationship to Advanced-Technology Usage at US Manufacturing Establishments," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 62(245), pages 89-107, February.
  12. Burgess, Simon & Lane, Julia & Stevens, David, 1995. "Job Flows, Worker Flows and Churning," CEPR Discussion Papers 1125, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. Sang V Nguyen & Arnold P Reznek, 1990. "Returns to Scale in Small and Large U.S. Manufacturing Establishments," Working Papers 90-11, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  14. Alfred R Nucci & Timothy Bates, 1990. "An Analysis of Small Business Size and Rate of Discontinuance," Working Papers 90-2, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  15. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Howard J. Shatz, 1994. "Trade and Jobs in Manufacturing," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 25(1), pages 1-84.
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Cited by:
  1. Ethan Lewis, 2005. "Immigration, skill mix, and the choice of technique," Working Papers 05-8, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  2. Adela Luque & C.J. Krizan, 2009. "The Micro-Dynamics of Skill Mix Changes in a Dual Labor Market: The Spanish Manufacturing Experience," Working Papers 09-12, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

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