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Germany: Managing Migration in the 21st Century

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  • Martin, Philip L.
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    Abstract

    This monograph reviews Germany’s evolution from a country of emigration to a reluctant land of immigration between the 1960s and 1980s, as guest workers settled and asylum seekers arrived. During the 1990s, Germany became a magnet for diverse foreigners, including the families of settled guest workers, newly mobile Eastern Europeans and ethnic Germans, and asylum seekers from throughout the world. Germany, with a relatively structured and rigid labor market and economy, finds it easier to integrate especially unskilled newcomers into generous social welfare programs than into the labor market. Since immigration means change as immigrants and Germans adjust to each other, an aging German populace may resist the changes in the economy and labor market that could facilitate immigrant integration as well as the changes in culture and society that invariably accompany immigrants.

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    File URL: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/1gb6j203.pdf;origin=repeccitec
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Institute of European Studies, UC Berkeley in its series Institute of European Studies, Working Paper Series with number qt1gb6j203.

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    Date of creation: 01 May 2002
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    Handle: RePEc:cdl:bineur:qt1gb6j203

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    Keywords: CIIP;

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    1. Philip L. Martin & Mark J. Miller, 1980. "Guestworkers: Lessons from Western Europe," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 33(3), pages 315-330, April.
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    Cited by:
    1. Leilanie Basilio & Thomas K. Bauer, 2010. "Transferability of Human Capital and Immigrant Assimilation – An Analysis for Germany," Ruhr Economic Papers 0164, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    2. Basilio, Leilanie & Bauer, Thomas K. & Sinning, Mathias, 2009. "Analyzing the labor market activity of immigrant families in Germany," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 510-520, October.

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