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Can behavioral finance models account for historical asset prices?

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  • ap Gwilym, Rhys

Abstract

I construct a behavioral model of asset pricing in which agents choose whether to base their expectations on chartist or fundamental forecasts. I simulate the model in order to test its efficacy in explaining the moments and time series properties of the FTSE All-Share index, and find that the model cannot be rejected as the data generating process.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section in its series Cardiff Economics Working Papers with number E2009/17.

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Length: 10 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cdf:wpaper:2009/17

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Keywords: Behavioral finance; Asset pricing;

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  1. Meenagh, David & Minford, Patrick & Peel, David, 2007. "Simulating stock returns under switching regimes - A new test of market efficiency," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 235-239, February.
  2. J. Bradford De Long & Andrei Shleifer & Lawrence H. Summers & Robert J. Waldmann, . "Noise Trader Risk in Financial Markets," J. Bradford De Long's Working Papers _124, University of California at Berkeley, Economics Department.
  3. Shlomo Benartzi & Richard H. Thaler, 1993. "Myopic Loss Aversion and the Equity Premium Puzzle," NBER Working Papers 4369, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Cheol-Ho Park & Scott H. Irwin, 2007. "What Do We Know About The Profitability Of Technical Analysis?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(4), pages 786-826, 09.
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As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Progress & data in economics
    by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2009-10-19 13:55:25
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Cited by:
  1. Hatcher, Michael C. & Minford, Patrick, 2013. "Stabilization policy, rational expectations and price-level versus inflation targeting: a survey," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2013/14, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
  2. Rhys ap Gwilym, 2013. "The Monetary Policy Implications of Behavioral Asset Bubbles," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 80(1), pages 252-270, July.

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