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Projections of future emissions and energy use from passenger cars as a result of policies in the EU with a dynamic model of technological change

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  • Aileen Lam

    ()
    (Cambridge Centre for Climate Change Mitigation Research, Department of Land Economy, University of Cambridge)

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    Abstract

    Transport is the only sector in the EU in which greenhouse gas emissions are still rising. This paper uses the FTT (future technology transformation) framework to project energy use and emissions from passenger cars in the EU 27 until 2050. Projections are made based on four policy scenarios in order to explore the effect of different policies on penetration and diffusion of cleaner transport technologies. All our scenario projections support the dominance of hybrid cars in 2050. However, our results illustrate that strong emission targets cannot be achieved by only encouraging low-emitting cars, but requires strong policies targeting the cleanest cars. Further emission reductions can be achieved by non-pecuniary measures such as car use reductions and scrappage schemes.

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    File URL: http://be.4cmr.group.cam.ac.uk/working-papers/pdf/4cmr_WP_05.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2013
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by University of Cambridge, Department of Land Economy, Cambridge Centre for Climate Change Mitigation Research in its series 4CMR Working Paper Series with number 005.

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    Length: 29 pages
    Date of creation: Oct 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ccc:wpaper:005

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    Keywords: Transport; Technological change; Emissions; Fuel use;

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