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Re-inventing New Zealand: Institutions Output and Patents 1870-1939

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Abstract

New estimates of commodity output and patenting are used to explore New Zealand’s transition from extensive to intensive growth. By investigating the cointegrating and causal relationships among the output of 25 industries we show that a small number of common trends shaped the contours of her economic development. In turn the leading industries were driven by knowledge growth as reflected in patents statistics. New Zealand's distinctive institutions and human capital fostered the knowledge which transformed the farming landscape, promoted wider land ownership, and created a production system which integrated farm and factory to promote intensive growth.

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File URL: http://www.econ.canterbury.ac.nz/RePEc/cbt/econwp/0815.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 08/15.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: 01 Aug 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cbt:econwp:08/15

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Keywords: Growth; Institutions; Patents; Common trends; Commodity output; New Zealand Research and Development;

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References

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  1. Greasley, David & Oxley, Les, 2007. "Patenting, intellectual property rights and sectoral outputs in Industrial Revolution Britain, 1780-1851," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 139(2), pages 340-354, August.
  2. Crafts, N. F. R., 1997. "The Human Development Index and changes in standards of living: Some historical comparisons," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(03), pages 299-322, December.
  3. McAleer, Michael & Oxley, Les, 1998. " Cointegration in Practice," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(5), pages 417-22, December.
  4. Clark, Andrew H., 1945. "The Historical Explanation of Land Use in New Zealand," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(02), pages 215-230, November.
  5. Galor, Oded & Moav, Omer & Vollrath, Dietrich, 2008. "Inequality in Land Ownership, the Emergence of Human Capital Promoting Institutions and the Great Divergence," CEPR Discussion Papers 6751, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Kenneth L. Sokoloff & B. Zorina Khan, 1989. "The Democratization of Invention During Early Industrialization: Evidence from the United States, 1790-1846," NBER Historical Working Papers 0010, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Sullivan, Richard J., 1989. "England's Age of invention: The acceleration of patents and patentable invention during the industrial revolution," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 424-452, October.
  8. David Greasley & Les Oxley, 2008. "The Pastoral Boom, the Rural Land Market, and Long Swings in New Zealand Economic Growth 1873-1939," Working Papers in Economics 08/02, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
  9. KevinH. O'Rourke, 2007. "Culture, Conflict and Cooperation: Irish Dairying Before the Great War," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(523), pages 1357-1379, October.
  10. Greasley, David & Oxley, Les, 2000. "British Industrialization, 1815-1860: A Disaggregate Time-Series Perspective," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 98-119, January.
  11. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silane & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1996. "Trust in Large Organizations," NBER Working Papers 5864, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Magee, Gary Bryan, 1999. "Technological Development and Foreign Patenting: Evidence from 19th-Century Australia," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 344-359, October.
  13. S. Encel & A. Inglis, 1966. "Patents, Inventions and Economic Progress," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 42(1-4), pages 572-588, 03.
  14. Greasley, David & Oxley, Les, 2000. "Measuring New Zealand's GDP 1865-1933: A Cointegration-Based Approach," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 46(3), pages 351-68, September.
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Cited by:
  1. Dan Liu & Christopher M. Meissner, 2013. "Market Potential and the Rise of US Productivity Leadership," NBER Working Papers 18819, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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