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Poverty and Productivity in Female-Headed Households in Zimbabwe

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  • Horrell, S.
  • Krishnan, P.

Abstract

A household survey conducted in rural Zimbabwe in 2001 is used to compare the position of de facto and de jure female-headed households to those with a male head. These households are characterised by different forms of poverty that impinge on their ability to improve agricultural productivity. However, once inputs are accounted for, it is only for growing cotton that female-headed households’ productivity is lower than that found for male-headed households. General poverty alleviation policies will benefit the female-headed household but specific interventions via extension services and access to marketing consortia are also indicated.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge in its series Cambridge Working Papers in Economics with number 0663.

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Length: 29
Date of creation: Jul 2006
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Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:0663

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Keywords: Africa; Zimbabwe; gender; poverty; female-headed households; agriculture;

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Cited by:
  1. Naudé, Wim, 2012. "Entrepreneurship and economic development: Theory, evidence and policy," MERIT Working Papers 027, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  2. Milazzo, Annamaria, 2014. "Son preference, fertility and family structure : evidence from reproductive behavior among Nigerian women," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6869, The World Bank.
  3. World Bank, 2014. "Face of Poverty in Madagascar : Poverty, Gender, and Inequality Assessment," World Bank Other Operational Studies 18250, The World Bank.
  4. Rijkers, Bob & Costa, Rita, 2012. "Gender and Rural Non-Farm Entrepreneurship," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 40(12), pages 2411-2426.
  5. Peterman, Amber & Behrman, Julia & Quisumbing, Agnes, 2010. "A review of empirical evidence on gender differences in nonland agricultural inputs, technology, and services in developing countries," IFPRI discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 975, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Croppenstedt, Andre & Goldstein, Markus & Rosas, Nina, 2013. "Gender and agriculture : inefficiencies, segregation, and low productivity traps," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6370, The World Bank.
  7. Ragasa, Catherine, 2012. "Gender and Institutional Dimensions of Agricultural Technology Adoption: A Review of Literature and Synthesis of 35 Case Studies," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil, International Association of Agricultural Economists 126747, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  8. Michael Rogan, 2013. "Poverty and Headship in Post-apartheid South Africa, 1997–2006," Social Indicators Research, Springer, Springer, vol. 113(1), pages 491-511, August.
  9. Oginni, Ayodeji & Ahonsi, Babatunde & Ukwuije, Francis, 2013. "Are female-headed households typically poorer than male-headed households in Nigeria?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 132-137.
  10. van de Walle, Dominique, 2011. "Lasting welfare effects of widowhood in a poor country," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5734, The World Bank.
  11. Sylvie Lambert & Pauline Rossi, 2014. "Sons as Widowhood Insurance: Evidence from Senegal," PSE Working Papers halshs-00948098, HAL.
  12. van de Walle, Dominique, 2013. "Lasting Welfare Effects of Widowhood in Mali," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 1-19.
  13. Peterman, Amber & Quisumbing, Agnes & Behrman, Julia & Nkonya, Ephraim, 2010. "Understanding gender differences in agricultural productivity in Uganda and Nigeria," IFPRI discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 1003, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  14. Michael Rogan, 2012. "Poverty and headship in post-apartheid South Africa, 1997-2008," Working Papers 288, Economic Research Southern Africa.

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