Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Conceptualising the Politics of Social Protection in Africa

Contents:

Author Info

  • Sam Hickey
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    Despite growing international interest with social protection, little is known about the forms of politics that tend to underpin - and emerge from - such interventions. For example, under what conditions do governments and political elites implement and sustain social protection policies? How important are the forms of politics promoted under the 'good governance' agenda, such as regular elections, civil society involvement and decentralisation? What role do donors play as political actors in poor countries? This paper starts to address these questions via a conceptual framework that is derived from synthesising an analysis of politics in Africa with a review of past social protection policies. This framework embraces: political institutions, political actors and agencies, socio-economic forces and the global dimension. It is argued that the notion of a 'political contract' can explain the ways in which these combine to shape the politics of social protection in Africa, and that this notion can offer a normative and theoretical framework for thinking about and promoting social protection.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.bwpi.manchester.ac.uk/medialibrary/publications/working_papers/bwpi-wp-0407.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by BWPI, The University of Manchester in its series Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series with number 0407.

    as in new window
    Length:
    Date of creation: 2007
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:bwp:bwppap:0407

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: Humanities Bridgeford Street, Oxford Road,Manchester, M13 9PL
    Phone: +44(0)7717 881567
    Web page: http://www.bwpi.manchester.ac.uk/
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Robert Holzmann & Steen Jorgensen, 2000. "Social risk management : a new conceptual framework for social protection and beyond," Social Protection Discussion Papers 21314, The World Bank.
    2. Casamatta, Georges & Cremer, Helmuth & Pestieau, Pierre, 2000. "Political sustainability and the design of social insurance," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 341-364, March.
    3. Iglesias, Augusto & Palacios, Robert J., 2000. "Managing public pension reserves - Part I : evidence from the international experience," Social Protection Discussion Papers 21311, The World Bank.
    4. Case, A. & Deaton, A., 1996. "Large Cash Transfers to the Elderly in South Africa," Papers 176, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Development Studies.
    5. Green, Maia & Hulme, David, 2005. "From correlates and characteristics to causes: thinking about poverty from a chronic poverty perspective," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 867-879, June.
    6. Yi, Feng & Gizelis, Theodora-Ismene, 2002. "Building Political Consensus and Distributing Resources: A Trade-Off or a Compatible Choice?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(1), pages 217-36, October.
    7. Arjan de Haan & Jeremy Holland & Nazneen Kanji, 2002. "Social funds: an effective instrument to support local action for poverty reduction?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(5), pages 643-652.
    8. Timothy Besley & Robin Burgess & Imran Rasul, 2003. "Benchmarking government provision of social safety nets," Social Protection Discussion Papers 27870, The World Bank.
    9. Schady, Norbert R., 1999. "Seeking votes - the political economy of expenditures by the Peruvian Social Fund (FONCODES), 1991-95," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2166, The World Bank.
    10. Hulme, David & Shepherd, Andrew, 2003. "Conceptualizing Chronic Poverty," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 403-423, March.
    11. Block, Steven A., 2002. "Political business cycles, democratization, and economic reform: the case of Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 205-228, February.
    12. Hickey, Sam, 2005. "The politics of staying poor: exploring the political space for poverty reduction in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 995-1009, June.
    13. Gore, Charles, 2000. "The Rise and Fall of the Washington Consensus as a Paradigm for Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 789-804, May.
    14. Lawrence Haddad & Manfred Zeller, 1997. "Can social security programmes do more with less? General issues and the challenges for Southern Africa," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(2), pages 125-153.
    15. Hossain, Naomi, 2005. "Productivity and Virtue: Elite Categories of the Poor in Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 965-977, June.
    16. David Stasavage, 2003. "Democracy and Education Spending: Has Africas Move to Multiparty Elections Made a Difference to Policy?," STICERD - Development Economics Papers - From 2008 this series has been superseded by Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers 37, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
    17. Bratton, Michael & Mattes, Robert, 2003. "Support for Economic Reform? Popular Attitudes in Southern Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 303-323, February.
    18. Datt, Gaurav & Payongayong, Ellen & Garrett, James L. & Ruel, Marie T., 1997. "The GAPVU cash transfer program in Mozambique," FCND discussion papers 36, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Brunori, Paolo & O'Reilly, Marie, 2010. "Social protection for development: a review of definitions," MPRA Paper 29495, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Bassett, Lucy & Giannozzi, Sara & Pop, Lucian & Ringold, Dena, 2012. "Rules, roles, and controls : governance in social protection with an application to social assistance," Social Protection Discussion Papers 67612, The World Bank.
    3. Armando Barrientos & Jasmina Byrne & Paola Peña & Juan Miguel Villa & UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, 2013. "Social Transfers and Child Protection," Innocenti Working Papers inwopa691, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bwp:bwppap:0407. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Rowena Harding).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.