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The Nature of Civil Conflict

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This research empirically establishes that the emergence, prevalence, and recurrence of civil conflict in the modern era reflect the long shadow of prehistory. Exploiting variations across contemporary national populations, it demonstrates that genetic diversity, as determined pre- dominantly tens of thousands of years ago, has contributed significantly to the frequency, incidence, and onset of both overall and ethnic civil conflicts over the last half century, accounting for a large set of geographical and institutional correlates of civil conflict, as well as measures of economic development. These findings arguably reflect the adverse effect of genetic diversity on interpersonal trust and cooperation, the potential impact of genetic diversity on income inequality, the potential association between genetic diversity and divergence in preferences for public goods and redistributive policies, and the contribution of genetic diversity to the degree of fractionalization and polarization across ethnic and linguistic groups in the population

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File URL: http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Economics/Papers/2013/2013-15_paper.pdf
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Paper provided by Brown University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2013-15.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:bro:econwp:2013-15

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Postal: Department of Economics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912

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  1. Caselli, Francesco & Coleman II, Wilbur John, 2006. "On the Theory of Ethnic Conflict," CEPR Discussion Papers 5622, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Jos� G. Montalvo & Marta Reynal-Querol, 2005. "Ethnic Polarization, Potential Conflict, and Civil Wars," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(3), pages 796-816, June.
  3. José Garcia Montalvo & Marta Reynal-Querol, 2004. "Ethnic polarization, potential conflict and civil wars," Economics Working Papers 770, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Mar 2005.
  4. Fearon, James D, 2003. " Ethnic and Cultural Diversity by Country," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 195-222, June.
  5. William T. Alpert & Stephen A. Woodbury, 2000. "Introduction," Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers, in: William T. Alpert & Stephen A. Woodbury (ed.), Employee Benefits and Labor Markets in Canada and the United States, chapter 1, pages 1-12 W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  6. Francesco Caselli & Wilbur John Coleman II, 2006. "On the theory of ethnic conflict," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 3561, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
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