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Parent Altruism, Cash Transfers and Child Poverty

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  • Sonia Bhalotra

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Abstract

This paper investigates the contemporary sharing of household resources between parents and co-resident children, motivated by the increasing popularity of cash transfers targeted at children, and limited evidence of their efficacy. It argues that this provides information on parental altruism which, though commonly assumed, has been challenged in recent research. The main finding is that the within-household allocation of resources is consistent with altruism. A further finding is that households that smoke (spend on tobacco) systematically spend less on children.

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File URL: http://www.efm.bris.ac.uk/economics/working_papers/pdffiles/dp04561.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK in its series Bristol Economics Discussion Papers with number 04/561.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bri:uobdis:04/561

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Keywords: altruism; m-demands; intra-household allocation; human capital; child labour; education;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Heather Congdon Fors, 2012. "Child Labour: A Review Of Recent Theory And Evidence With Policy Implications," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(4), pages 570-593, 09.
  2. Bargain, Olivier & Donni, Olivier & Kwenda, Prudence, 2014. "Intrahousehold distribution and poverty: Evidence from Côte d'Ivoire," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 262-276.
  3. Sonia Bhalotra, 2004. "Early Childhood Investments in Human Capital: Parental Resources and Preferences," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK 04/562, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.

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